5 Questions for Bernie Sanders Supporters

October 23, 2015   |   Derrick Broze

Op-Ed by Derrick Broze
October 23, 2015

(ANTIMEDIA) Houston, TX — I have five simple questions for supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign. Before I get to them, I find it necessary to preface this with a plea for logic and respectful communication. I am going to be critical of Bernie, and I need you to listen, remain calm, take in the information, and answer honestly.

I ask that you refrain from calling me a shill, a Republican agent, or anything of that sort. I also ask that before you write off Anti Media as “another corporate media shill,” you take a moment to consider that we have praised Bernie when he was in the right (see here and here). We have also called him out in the areas where he needs work.

Personally, I am slightly frightened by the online interactions I have witnessed from those who #FeelTheBern. There seems to be a tendency to dismiss anyone who criticizes Bernie as either a Donald Trump supporter or simply an idiot. I can only speak for myself and say that neither of those accusations are true. This hysteria around Sanders is reminiscent of Obama’s supporters, who were quick to attack detractors pointing out that “Hope and Change” was quickly turning into more of the same.

And now on to the questions. Each of them relates to Sanders’ own comments about his potential presidency. I ask that you respond to each comment individually and think about what exactly you are looking for when you say you want to vote for a president.

If you are seeking more freedom and prosperity, ask yourself if that is what you will get by voting for any of the current candidates. If you are seeking to reclaim the moral high ground the United States may have once had, ask yourself if these policies will do just that. Please, please stand by your principles and do not allow the Corporate-State powers to pull the wool over your eyes.

Question 1. Would Bernie’s tax on Wall Street speculation work?

Bernie Sanders has said that he would tax Wall Street speculation and use the funding to pay for his “free” public college tuition program. A fact check by the Associated Press reported that “Sanders’ plan would cover tuition and fees at public universities – a $70 billion annual expense with the federal government picking up two-thirds of that tab by taxing trading in the financial markets.”

Students would still be on the hook for room and board costs that average $9,804, according to the College Board,” the AP added.

But would this Wall Street speculation tax actually achieve the desired outcome? Donald J. Boudreaux, Professor of Economics at George Mason University, does not believe the plan can work. Boudreaux recently wrote:

If such speculation is as economically destructive as Mr. Sanders regularly proclaims it to be, the tax on speculation should be set high enough to drastically reduce it.  But if – as Mr. Sanders presumably wishes – speculation is drastically reduced, very little will remain of it to be taxed and, thus, such a tax will not generate enough revenue to pay for Mr. Sanders’s scheme of making all public colleges and universities ‘tuition-free.’

If a speculation tax is a successful deterrent, there will likely be a decrease in speculation and therefore, very little funds to appropriate for a college tuition fund. Can Bernie’s Wall Street speculation tax work?

Question 2. Do you support an increase in payroll tax for all Americans to fund Bernie’s minimum wage and healthcare plans? Do you believe Bernie’s plans will only tax the 1%?
Bernie Sanders recently appeared on This Week with George Stephanopoulos to discuss his plans for his presidency. Stephanopoulos asked Sanders about his plans to tax the wealthiest Americans. Here is a segment of the transcript:

Stephanopoulos: But to pay for all of your programs, you’re going to have to do more than tax the top 1 percent. How far below the top 1 percent are you going to go with tax hikes?

Sanders: It is not true that we have to go much further.

Stephanopoulos:  Tax hikes below the top 1 percent? No tax hikes below the top 1 percent?

Sanders: I didn’t say that. I think if you’re looking about guaranteeing paid family and medical leave, which virtually every other major country has, so that when a mom gives birth, she doesn’t have to go back to work in two weeks, or there’s an illness in a family, dad or mom can stay home with the kids. That will require a small increase in the payroll tax.

Stephanopoulos: That’s going to hit everybody.

Sanders: That would hit every — yes, it would.

Bernie Sanders was also quizzed on his plans on a recent episode of “Real Time with Bill Maher”:

So you’re saying we can pay for all of this without raising taxes on anybody but the 1 percent?” Maher asked.
We may have to go down a little bit lower than that — but not much lower,” Sanders replied.

Do you trust Sanders when he says the payroll tax will be “small” and that he will only raise taxes on the 1% (or a little bit lower)?

Question 3. Do you support Bernie’s comments on Edward Snowden?

Sanders has openly spoke against the NSA’s massive surveillance programs but stands with the rest of the presidential candidates in his belief  that Snowden should face some type of punishment. At the first Democratic presidential debate, Bernie was asked about his position on Edward Snowden. Sanders said he believes Snowden “played a very important role in educating the American people” — but he broke the law. “I think there should be a penalty to that,” he said. “But I think that education should be taken into consideration before the sentencing.

I know some Bernie supporters may feel these comments provide some hope for Snowden to receive a fair trial, but the truth is that Snowden could not possibly face anything resembling a fair trial in the U.S. Simply look at the prosecution (and persecution) of Chelsea Manning, Barrett Brown, Jeffrey Sterling, and John Kiriakou to see the way whistleblowers are treated in the land of the free. Snowden should be welcomed home as a hero and the masterminds of the NSA’s spying programs should be the ones facing penalties.

Question 4. Do you support Bernie’s stance on Israel and Saudi Arabia? Both of these nations are responsible for atrocious human rights violations (here and here). Saudi Arabia is also accused of funding the 9/11 attacks. Despite this, the majority of politicians — including Bernie — continue to support these nations.

Last summer, as Israeli soldiers deliberately targeted hospitals in Operative Protective Edge, Sanders joined the rest of the U.S. Senate by unanimously voting to support Israel’s actions and supporting “the State of Israel as it defends itself against unprovoked rocket attacks from the Hamas terrorist organization.”

Mint Press News recently reported on Sanders’ Israel stance:

“Yet when it comes to more recent statements, journalists describe Sanders as difficult to pin down on foreign policy issues, including Israel. Josh Nathan-Kazis, writing in June for Forward, noted that ‘a search of the Congressional Record reveals very few statements about Israel by Sanders on the floor of the House or the Senate,’ but ‘in February 2015, Sanders was the first Senator to announce that he would skip Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to a joint session of Congress.’”

Nathan-Kazis reports that Sanders does have limited ties to AIPAC, the pro-Israel lobbying group that’s trying to drive the U.S. to war with Iran:

“In Vermont, a small group of AIPAC-linked Jewish activists do have Sanders’ ear on Israel-related matters. Yoram Samets, a Burlington businessman and a member of AIPAC’s national council, said that he has been in touch with Sanders for the past decade, but that Sanders does not sign any AIPAC-backed letters. His Vermont colleague Senator Patrick Leahy does not, either.”

Though it appears Sanders keeps his distance from Israeli radicals like Netanyahu, his silence on the matter and support of Operation Protective Edge reveals his true stance.

Sanders also recently spoke about Saudi Arabia while taping a PBS show at the University of Virginia. Sanders’ said the nation with untold amounts of blood dripping off its hands should “get their hands dirty” and take a bigger role in the war against ISIS. Why would someone interested in ending the wars demand that a nation known for blatant human rights violations “get their hands dirty” and support more war? Saudi Arabia killed dozens of civilians in a single airstrike over a wedding in Yemen last month, yet Sanders still believes they should lead the assault on the Islamic State.

Should we expect President Sanders to continue supporting these nations?

Question 5. Do you support Bernie’s plan to continue the drone program? According to documents released by a new whistleblower, during one five-month period of drone operations, nearly 90 percent of the people killed in airstrikes were not the intended targets.

Senator Bernie Sanders recently said he would continue Obama’s disastrous drone program, which has resulted in the deaths of innocent people across the Middle East. In late August, Truthdig reported that Bernie Sanders told George Stephanopoulos he would continue the program.

I think we have to use drones very, very selectively and effectively. That has not always been the case.” Sanders said. “What you can argue is that there are times and places where drone attacks have been effective. … There are times and places where they have been absolutely countereffective and have caused more problems than they have solved. When you kill innocent people, the end result is that people in the region become anti-American who otherwise would not have been.”

Sanders is absolutely right that killing innocent people fosters anti-American sentiment around the world (this makes his push for the civilian-killing Saudi military’s involvement in the fight against ISIS all the more puzzling). In 2014, the journal Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict released two papers discussing the use of drones by the military and found an increasing number of Americans are against the use of drones on suspected terrorists in foreign countries. One paper notes that if drones continue to receive negative publicity within the United States and abroad, they may become “politically impractical.” The second paper asks whether drones are actually increasing the power of anti-U.S. protesters by gaining sympathy with the civilian population.

According to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, the CIA carried out 27 drone strikes in Pakistan during 2013, as well as 38 in Yemen — including the now infamous attack on December 12, 2013 that killed 15 people at a wedding. TBIJ estimates there have been over 2,400 deaths since Obama took over the drones. Since official numbers are not recorded, it is difficult to know exactly how many civilians have been killed under the U.S. drone program. However, Senator Lindsey Graham has estimated that 4,700 people have been killed.

These numbers seem to line up with what the newest whistleblower has stated: “Anyone caught in the vicinity is guilty by association,” the whistleblower told The Intercept. When “a drone strike kills more than one person, there is no guarantee that those persons deserved their fate.”

The whistleblower also stated that the program uses a phone number or email address to locate targets and is very unreliable. The source told The Intercept that drone bombings are carried out based on these phone numbers or emails and might not result in the death of the intended target.

Many are quick to say that we are keeping American soldiers safe by using drone warfare, but we are learning that this war is not being fought with accurate intelligence or oversight. With all of this information readily available, how can Bernie Sanders continue to support this drone program?

These are my five questions for supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign. I hope some of you made it this far and were willing to read and respond with respect and honesty. It is important to recognize that there is a growing number of Americans who no longer buy into the two-party system and do not trust anyone running within those parties. Rather than voting for a new leader every four years, these radicals focus on creating solutions built on voluntary association and mutual aid rather than government force. Remember, not everyone is an idiot, a Republican, or an apathetic sheeple. Some of us simply disagree with Bernie’s economics and solutions.

Personally, I recommend each of you begin researching agorism and seeking solutions outside of the ballot box.


This article (5 Questions for Bernie Sanders Supporters) is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Derrick Broze and theAntiMedia.org. Anti-Media Radio airs weeknights at 11pm Eastern/8pm Pacific. Image credit: Donkey Hotey. If you spot a typo, email edits@theantimedia.org.

Author: Derrick Broze

Derrick Broze joined Anti-Media as an independent journalist in July of 2014. His topics of interest include solutions to the police state, the surveillance state, economic inequality, attacks on Native communities, and oppression in all its forms. He was born in Houston, Texas.

Share This Post On

113 Comments

  1. You actually have brought up legit questions (something everybody should be doing for all candidates). If honestly, there's a lot more against all of them. For example…why are they trying to sell America's Soul for the TPP? Why aren't they ending the gimmicks in public education (Read: why haven't they repealed the failed No Child Left Behind Act of 2000)? Why exactly are the elderly, working poor, children, and disabled have the deck stacked against them? Finally, why exactly are we we NOT holding corrupt officials to account, and facing prison time for their misdeeds?

    Post a Reply
  2. The speculation tax is just a fraction of a percent. That's not going to deter anyone. But it will provide revenue.

    Post a Reply
  3. Question 2: Americans need to care more about each other and less about money. I'll take an extremely small hit to my paycheck to ensure every working woman in this country, and their husbands, have valuable time to spend with their newborn. If I could join the army and sign an infinite contract, I can provide next to nothing out od my paycheck every two weeks.

    Post a Reply
  4. If the speculation tax collects little revenue because it successfully discourages speculation; GOOD. We need long term investment, where the money have to go, not speculation. Warren Buffet agrees on this one.

    Post a Reply
  5. #4 were not team America world police. We need to provide military support when necessary, yes. But, when we also provide them a shit ton of money, they should be able to take the lead in the isis battle. Forget human rights over there, their religions trump any moral reasoning. Let them all deal with it.

    Post a Reply
  6. All very pertinent questions. But he's a politician, there's always going to be some sort of double speak when you are listening to a politician. The thing that seems to stand out when I listen to Mr Sanders is that he is saying now pretty much the same things that he has been saying for his entire political career. I, for one, trust him. I also expect some disappointments along the way if he does become president. But given the choices that we are being offered I firmly believe that Mr Sanders is far and away the best candidate for the job.

    Post a Reply
  7. Which candidate constantly calls for a popular revolution?
    Which candidate calls upon citizens to participate?
    Which candidate declares "it's not about me"?
    Which candidate travels coach?

    Post a Reply
  8. I honestly don't care about the last 3 issues: we have too much terrible shit happening here to address first. So yes, the speculation tax probably will work, as well as the progressive tax for those who can afford it. And I personally don't mind being taxed more, knowing that it will be going toward funding public education, healthcare, and sustainable energy programs, and just as importantly, NOT going toward bailing out billionaires from their gambling addiction. Foreign policy can fuck off till we get that kind of domestic stuff settled.

    Also Bernie is the only candidate who knows that the #1 threat to America is not ISIS/Al Qaeda/the Taliban/Iran, not illegal immigrants, and not even the banks: it's climate change, because climate change CANNOT be negotiated, can only hurt us, and it's happening right now, no matter what anybody has to say about it.

    Post a Reply
  9. Like all candidates he has blind sides but I trust he can be pushed further left after being elected. There's his platform and then there's the peoples. All he's doing is pulling the cork so the Genie can be released to do her magic

    Post a Reply
  10. no one supports hillary. we're just tired of people pretending bernie is the next great savior, he has faults- just like obama and anyone else thats ever been president. Doesnt matter anyway MSM is going to keep pushing hillary and the avg 40 something soccer mom is "ready for hillary" just wait and see… her or trump

    Post a Reply
  11. These are great questions and I'm sharing this article on my political page because I think that these are questions every voter should consider and things that Sanders himself is going to need to address. If we are to be a party of educated voters we cannot afford to look solely through idealistic eyes. Progressives cannot afford to be arrogant or blind at this juncture. Eyes Open.

    Post a Reply
  12. None of these points would deter me from voting for Sanders. If he is not perfect we use other peaceful means of protest and pressure. The ballot box is not the solution for everything, I agree, but he by far and away the best candidate now and for a long time.

    Post a Reply
  13. Point 1: the tax on the 1% will pay for most of the tuition plan, the wall street speculation tax will pay for some, and what he's saying is, that should cover it, but if that doesnt make it up we may have to go a little below the 1%

    Post a Reply
  14. Point 2: yes we all may have to pay some more, but if the minimum wage is increased and everyone has health care and maternity leave and most are making more money then it is well well worth it i think.

    Post a Reply
  15. Point 3: I personally don't believe Edward Snowden committed any crime, especially treason, because its not treason against america to release information to americans .. but seeing as he can't face a fair trial i don't support him in sayibg he should come home to trial.. maybe if it was a fair trial i would support it

    Post a Reply
  16. Point 4: i dont support him in supporting any country that commits human rights violations..

    Post a Reply
  17. so who would you vote for? as an anarcist is there any canidate that works for you? thanks

    Post a Reply
  18. And Point 5: i don't know what his plans are to change the deone program.. it sounds like he would use them very infrequently for certain things, not how they have been using them. But how do we know he wont keep it the same once he's in office. Overall i do agree that he his by far the best candidate b

    Post a Reply
  19. I think his tax plans WILL work and he is the most honest candidate in the race. I trust his JUDGEMENT, as he's been proven right about Iraq, the Patriot Act, the floundering middle class and much more. He's not beholden to corporations, billionaire donors or Super Pacs. Here's MY question for you: HOW COME YOU SAY NOTHING ABOUT CITIZENS UNITED or MONEY CORRUPTING POLITICS???

    Post a Reply
  20. OK. I've read your article thorougly. Now ask the Hillary supporters who they think she's lying to when she changes her stance on issues to match that of Senator Sanders despite accepting Big Money from Corporate Super PACS…Her Supporters? Or her Corporate Donors?
    Fair Enough?
    Trent Champ
    Central Texas for Bernie Sanders fb Admin and Friendly Neighborhood Organizer for BERNIE!

    Post a Reply
  21. I think he is a Trump supporter & that tells you everything you need to know lol!

    Post a Reply
  22. Those are really good questions, and I don't have answers for them – but to be honest? NO Political person is 100% perfect, and I appreciate fully that you've brought this post forward. I think that there needs to be more answers, and Sanders is actually bringing some – maybe not that we all agree on, but some good honest ones at that. Being that i'm an expat in NZ, i totally wish there was more transparency elsewhere for politics – seeing that i'm stuck watching John Key screw everything up.

    Post a Reply
  23. Since I have "liked" your page you have posted some questionable articles. But this is the final straw. Bernie is the ONLY honest man/woman running with topics I am concerned with. His answers may work and they may not but someone has to do SOMETHING. That's enough for me. I'm outta here.

    Post a Reply
  24. 1. Yes. It won't stop speculation. Of course it won't, and it's ridiculous to think that it would.
    2. So what?
    3. Yes.
    4. Yes.
    5. Yes.

    My question for you: since all we can do is choose the best from our available options, who do you honestly think is better for more people than Bernie Sanders?

    Post a Reply
  25. Is Bernie Sanders perfect- no, but neither is anyone else. Do I think he will make an excellent president-yes, because his ideas are sound. He has 30 yrs experience in dealing with both sides of the aisle, often being able to bridge gaps others could not. He is the only candidate with a fire and passion for fixing the gaping holes the corporations use to run our government behind closed doors. So while he may not meet all of your, or my, criteria to a tee, he is certainly the most conscientious of any of the candidates. And he most certainly will get things done, especially after we elect enough congress members who will work towards Bernies agendas, in lieu of fighting him.

    Post a Reply
  26. Four more years of War is Peace, Ignorance is Strenght and Slavery is Freedom.
    Four more. May all your interventions be "Humanitarian".
    Four more years of pay-to-play politics, power and influence.
    Four more years of legalized bribery and served corporate interests.

    Vote for tweedle-dum or tweedle-dee
    And a framework of debate narrowed for you courtesy
    Of the ultra-rich and a media that filters
    But any voice that challenges their power
    (like Nader bounced in Boston by state-troppers
    Cos he don't speak for oil-tycoons and bankers, oh yeah
    Whose pursuit of happiness and liberty
    Demands a rhetoric of fear to be
    The litmus test for viable heirs to
    The phony drug-wars, the trumped-up rogue-states, the permanence of a war-economy).

    I feel less hopeful and less human
    As I'm reduced to nothing more than
    Cheering on embassy bombings
    As the liars pave their way through

    Four more years of War is Peace, Ignorance is Strenght and Slavery is Freedom.
    Four more. May all your interventions be "Humanitarian".
    Four more years of pay-to-play politics, power and influence.
    Four more years of legalized bribery and served corporate interests

    Post a Reply
  27. Are you doing any similar posts about the other candidates? If not, why not? You don't mention that all the other candidates support corporate interests above individual rights. You're article has not deterred me from voting for Bernie one iota. I welcome giving his ideas a try.

    Post a Reply
  28. Im just glad to see someone talking about what is needed and not the same ol political bullshit over and over. No one has all the answers gauranteed to work for sure, but this is a start to do what is really needed, a shake up long over due. Fight for whats right for everyone, not just the banks, wall st, corps and 1%. Our system is broke and there is no time to wait for the perfect candidate. We need to do it now Bernie will get it started and we will make it happen. Feel the Bern!

    Post a Reply
  29. Well questions #3, #4, & #5 can be posed to any of the presidential candidates, republican & democrat, & I doubt we'd get an acceptable answer from any of them.

    Post a Reply
  30. My responses to each question: 1) it might work, it might not work but does that mean we don't try? 2) even increasing payroll tax on top 15% is still only affecting the top 15% and they're all still in the millionaire bracket. 3) is there a candidate that has a better stance on snowden? Half of them want to execute him for treason! 4) is there a candidate with a better position on Israel? Bernie at least thinks Palestine has a right to exist. 5) does any candidate have a better stance on use of drones? Most want to use drones AND ground troops!

    Post a Reply
  31. Question 2- remove the cap and keep rates the same. If everybody has to pay into ss and medicare on ALL of their salary, then it would be solvent and paid leave would be an option. Don't keep the cap in place and punish the majority of us that make under $110,000.

    Post a Reply
  32. Very well written article btw. It's nice to see actual thought and discussion of ideas vs. mudslinging.

    Post a Reply
  33. I kind of have an inherent problem with these articles that desperately find things to question, attack, or try to cause doubt in Bernie Sanders. Mostly – because there's already been a vast media blackout and manipulation to prevent him from having the same chance as other candidates, and while these are effective questions, they should be asked of EVERY candidate. These questions are like saying, "Well, I know he's going to try to do something about it, but if I don't think they'll work, I'll vote for the other candidates that aren't even trying to address it."

    Bernie is honest and has been saying the same thing for years and doesn't flip flop on his policies. We have to try something to fix a lot of these systems, and he's the only one putting forth legitimate ideas, and while no one can be sure they will work, I trust that he will try, and that's good enough for me.

    Post a Reply
  34. How is it that you think we would move farther away from the old moral high ground that this country once had??? We can't go back to the 1950's or whatever you think was such a moral time in this country. Going into a needless war for profit and the continued racism that continues in this country…you call that moral? WAKE UP! That is what appears to me to be on the republican table. Why is it that the best the republicans can come up with is Donald trump and another Bush? At least the democrats have reasonable candidates, IMO

    Post a Reply
  35. 1. studies have schon that a 0.05% taxation of financial trading and speculations would bring in much more than what would pay for college tuiton. there would be much more. and if the top 0.01% would be taxed correctly, you would actually start to generate considerable surplus (unlikely that will be possible, which is why he say it needs to be more than the 1%, it might be the top 5%, which is still far from anyone you would know personally – if you are not at least 500billion heavy, you are not even part of the statistic of people who own something). Donald J. Boudreaux is wrong and paid. he has been working for murdoch for some time now and is on the side of wall street in most of his work. he is biased and not the best choice for that. i would go outside the usa to see really unbiased studies on the topic.
    it would not only cover tuition, it would cover far more. also, you absolutely need to cut military. a lot. that alone would be enough to pay it all. last but not least, sanders would like to dismantle a lot of the redundant security measures which cost you billions every year. that too would help much.

    2. yes. not only would it not be felt much – because the middle class would earn far more than it does now. so let me ask you this: would you rather earn $20 per hour and pay 20%, but get real healthcare, something that is similar to european standards, for everyone; or earn $8 and pay 10%. the numbers are only symbolic, but i hope you get what i mean.

    3. false equivalency. all of the whistleblowers you mentioned are trialed under the current administration. sanders would dismantle the nsa to start and might revert the way the others have been treated. sanders has a long record of human rights activism and i can imagine that he would change the current ways.

    4. not absolutely true. sanders is not really for intervention. he is not for the support of isreal, at least not more than support to palestine. sanders has been critical of the current nationalistic israel policies. and while sanders may not be hard liner against saudi arabia (no high ranked politician would ever be, soimply because you are too reliant on their oil), but that may change when the usa gets away from oil. sanders is choosing his battles. he is as an independent, open socialist and left wing liberal, and with all that, he is already alienating a whole lot of people. he needs to be realistic and careful what he attackes right away. does not mean he supports them.

    5. this too is, i think, a careful way of keeping away from the issue as much as he can. his idea is to use drones for non leathal purposes originally. not sure if he would really go with it though. these are all things that are inherently nationalistic and imperialistic and that is, sadly, the big generic notion in the usa. and going all out against all these things would eliminate him right off the bat.

    let me ask you this: who would be – in any of the stated questions – a better candidate. nobody else would do it better. none. there is not a single candidate who would stop the drones. no candidate who does not support israel or saudi arabis. no candidate would treat any of the whistle blowers any better. all the questions you have posted would be met with much worse solutions from any of the other candidates out there.
    is bernie perfect? probably not. he is humans and we are all faulty. but considering the line-up past and present, he would be the first good president you had since carter.

    Post a Reply
  36. Well Derrick Broze, Bernie politics haven't change for 40 years and he is a refreshing change from the corporate bought politicians we have running now in both parties. So yea I'm all in with the Bernie

    Post a Reply
  37. I do have answers for your questions. And I do agree with you that more people need to be ASKING questions, instead of blindly following a candidate based on rhetoric. I'm a Bernie supporter, but I'm one who has his eyes wide open.
    1. The tax on speculation should be somewhere between "minimal" and "wow, that almost makes it not worth it" to be truly effective, and as such, could (for a limited time) be enough to pay for the tuition idea. As revenue from that goes down, funding sources for the tuition costs will need to be reevaluated and adjusted. This is just the opening salvo of the plan… in the long run, the plan will begin to show fruit in the form of a better educated population with no student loan debt, which is a great stimulus for the economy and reason to conginue funding it after the speculation tax no longer suffices.
    2. I'm voting for Bernie knowing that my taxes will face an increase. However, I also know that he's serious about the rich paying their fair share, which I do not believe they do right now. Yes, there will be a bit of a hike for Average Joe, but the hike for Trump and those in the multimillion, multibillion clubs will be more in order to offset it. I never, ever believed Bernie's plan would not affect my tax bill, and I'm willing to pay more if it helps our economy and funds programs I want funded.
    3. Snowden is an interesting question. Do I support what he did as a whistleblower? Yes. Do I think there should be some protection for whistleblowers? Yes. Do I think Snowden went beyond simple whistleblowing and broke the law, and deserves punishment? Oddly, yes. Not for treason, certainly. But he broke the law.
    4. Israel and Saudi Arabia are US allies. I do agree that they are problematic allies, and I have my own problems with that. But I also believe that yes, Saudi Arabia should take more of an interest in policing the region and controlling extremists. And under the proper strictures and structures, their intervention there could be extremely helpful to US goals in the region.
    5. And now for my least popular opinion amongst my fellow liberals: I don't think drones are a horrifying evil. I think they way they're currently being USED is wrong, and horrifying mistakes are being made that are costing innocent people their lives. But even by the Bernie quotes you put in your article, so does Bernie. “I think we have to use drones very, very selectively and effectively. That has not always been the case.” I read that as, we've been screwing up and using them to hit targets indisciriminately, it's time to fix those policies.
    As I said, I'm definitely a Bernie supporter, but I am also one who knows what he's in for. I respect Bernie's opinions, his refusal to take money from superPACs, and the fact that he is fighting for equality in a country that has fallen further from equality than it ever should have. I may not agree with ALL his ideas, but there's never been a politicion whose goals and beliefs were more closely aligned to mine, to what my values have always been, as Bernie Sanders. He's got my vote.

    Post a Reply
  38. I do have answers for your questions. And I do agree with you that more people need to be ASKING questions, instead of blindly following a candidate based on rhetoric. I'm a Bernie supporter, but I'm one who has his eyes wide open.
    1. The tax on speculation should be somewhere between "minimal" and "wow, that almost makes it not worth it" to be truly effective, and as such, could (for a limited time) be enough to pay for the tuition idea. As revenue from that goes down, funding sources for the tuition costs will need to be reevaluated and adjusted. This is just the opening salvo of the plan… in the long run, the plan will begin to show fruit in the form of a better educated population with no student loan debt, which is a great stimulus for the economy and reason to conginue funding it after the speculation tax no longer suffices.
    2. I'm voting for Bernie knowing that my taxes will face an increase. However, I also know that he's serious about the rich paying their fair share, which I do not believe they do right now. Yes, there will be a bit of a hike for Average Joe, but the hike for Trump and those in the multimillion, multibillion clubs will be more in order to offset it. I never, ever believed Bernie's plan would not affect my tax bill, and I'm willing to pay more if it helps our economy and funds programs I want funded.
    3. Snowden is an interesting question. Do I support what he did as a whistleblower? Yes. Do I think there should be some protection for whistleblowers? Yes. Do I think Snowden went beyond simple whistleblowing and broke the law, and deserves punishment? Oddly, yes. Not for treason, certainly. But he broke the law.
    4. Israel and Saudi Arabia are US allies. I do agree that they are problematic allies, and I have my own problems with that. But I also believe that yes, Saudi Arabia should take more of an interest in policing the region and controlling extremists. And under the proper strictures and structures, their intervention there could be extremely helpful to US goals in the region.
    5. And now for my least popular opinion amongst my fellow liberals: I don't think drones are a horrifying evil. I think they way they're currently being USED is wrong, and horrifying mistakes are being made that are costing innocent people their lives. But even by the Bernie quotes you put in your article, so does Bernie. “I think we have to use drones very, very selectively and effectively. That has not always been the case.” I read that as, we've been screwing up and using them to hit targets indisciriminately, it's time to fix those policies.
    As I said, I'm definitely a Bernie supporter, but I am also one who knows what he's in for. I respect Bernie's opinions, his refusal to take money from superPACs, and the fact that he is fighting for equality in a country that has fallen further from equality than it ever should have. I may not agree with ALL his ideas, but there's never been a politicion whose goals and beliefs were more closely aligned to mine, to what my values have always been, as Bernie Sanders. He's got my vote.

    Post a Reply
  39. Let's see…any small increase in my taxes to increase the minimum wage and make education more accessible is a no brainer because both would help the economy and would easily overcome the small increase. When more Americans have more disposable earnings we all benefit. As a small business owner, I say, bring it on. Bernie is the only candidate who is not for sale.

    Post a Reply
  40. Let's see…any small increase in my taxes to increase the minimum wage and make education more accessible is a no brainer because both would help the economy and would easily overcome the small increase. When more Americans have more disposable earnings we all benefit. As a small business owner, I say, bring it on. Bernie is the only candidate who is not for sale.

    Post a Reply
  41. I think these are great questions that deserve real answers.

    Speculation probably will decrease as its costs increase. I think the free college piece is not realistic. Still, if we can lower the debt burden by 25%, we’ll be making real progress. I believe Sanders wants everyone to have the chance to get a higher education without spending the money that bought a house 30 years ago. I’ll continue to support him with the hope that when his ideal meets reality we can get a slice of the desired pie.

    I support a payroll tax for healthcare and minimum wage, even if it affects me directly. I want a stable, broadly prosperous society. The legions of poor—working and otherwise—are a threat to the stability of our society. Hitler and Mussolini rose to power in periods of widespread poverty and discontent. The United States is not immune. I am willing to shoulder a portion of the burden to prevent the rise of American extremism.

    Snowden should stay overseas. He won’t get a fair trial here. He should be greeted like a hero. The NSA who lied to us about not having a program designed to bypass my Fourth Amendment rights, then was revealed to have exactly that program, must be held accountable. No one currently running is going to promise to do that during the election cycle. That being the case, the answer is prejudicial against every candidate. I’m not going to stay home on Election Day over Snowden. (Sorry, dude. Other fish to fry.)

    “Though it appears Sanders keeps his distance from Israeli radicals like Netanyahu, his silence on the matter and support of Operation Protective Edge reveals his true stance.”

    That is a possible interpretation. Another interpretation is that his silence means he’s not keen on continuing to support Israel but recognizes he has to not fight every single battle that comes his way at the same time.

    “Sanders also recently spoke about Saudi Arabia while taping a PBS show at the University of Virginia. Sanders’ said the nation with untold amounts of blood dripping off its hands should “get their hands dirty” and take a bigger role in the war against ISIS. Why would someone interested in ending the wars demand that a nation known for blatant human rights violations “get their hands dirty” and support more war? Saudi Arabia killed dozens of civilians in a single airstrike over a wedding in Yemen last month, yet Sanders still believes they should lead the assault on the Islamic State.”

    The war has already started. It will continue with or without Saudi participation. Sanders is referring to Saudi Arabia’s role in fostering ISIS. The Saudis want the Assad regime replaced by a regime that will allow a pipeline carrying Gulf State natural gas to Turkey and thence to the European market. Civil war in Syria was supposed to yield regime change. ISIS was supposed to compel the United States to occupy Syria, which would clear the way for the pipeline. In other words, we were supposed to do Saudi Arabia’s dirty work in Syria the way we did it in Iraq. Saudi Arabia helped create the ISIS problem. Sanders thinks they ought to help fix it. Not an unreasonable idea, truth be told.

    RE: drones

    The drones suck. No argument there. They are a problem without a solution for now, though I’m open to suggestions more realistic than “Just say no”. A Republican POTUS or Mrs. Clinton will block the sun with drones. While I dislike the lesser of two evils option, until we have figured out how we’re going to fight the war of the shadows and win, the drones will continue to fly and strike. Under Sanders, there’s some chance that there will be fewer than 1,000 strikes per month.

    RE: agorism

    There’s no reason why we can’t pursue both strategies simultaneously. You can’t get long-term change until you have set the stage in the short term. Failure to participate at the ballot box hands the power to make change to others. They will not set the stage for agorism.

    Post a Reply
  42. Bernie is the real deal he is genuine and sincere. He will listen to the voice of the people when elected. His record speaks for itself. He is in this to make a better world for his kids and grandkids. Maybe not perfect but by far the best choice and the only chance for the working class. I think his ideas of avoiding unneccesary war and taking a support role along with other major countries instead of being in the forefront is solid and his economic policies are also. Far too many lives lost in for profit wars and Economist Robert Reich supports Bernie's economic plan. We must move towards peace and prosperity!!! Weapons too deadly now, climate change too dangerous to ignore, and the working class is in grave danger. Need real change. There are trillions of dollars in offshore accounts, that is just one source of income – his economic plan is sensible. He is all about a thriving middle and working class.

    Post a Reply
  43. The author raises some good points, and I don't doubt the accuracy in relating the need to question Bernie more closly.

    Especially #4.

    Hardcore Bernie supports would have seen the infamous "Vermont town-hall" video (Google it if you havn't seen it); his blind support of Israel and its illegal settlements is a big concern and one that has made me pause in backing him.

    But would Hillary really be any different?

    Be truthfull!

    So, who then?
    …Maybe Chafee.

    But "we" chased him out. (But I don't blame us; as a resident of his former Governership, I can attest that he's a great guy (he was THE ONLY Republican Senator who voted AGINST the Iraq bull-shit bill. That's takes balls: he lost his Senate seet in 2004: the RDC gave him NO MONEY to run against a good D canidate at the time in a solid D State in a National wave of Ds); but he's not Presidential material.

    So #4 is not *really* an argument as Hillary has the same positions.

    I have more pertinent points in the conlusion that
    Bernie will make a great Vice President,
    but I'm watching a marathon It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia;
    I want to enjoy my
    evening.

    Post a Reply
  44. Point 1: Will a tax on wall street work? Maybe. While Bernie does give some hyperbole into how damaging wall street speculation can be, the reality is, it is the backbone of how finance works in our world today. If you aren't familiar with how trading works, do yourself a favor and watch the excellent comedy, Trading Places. At any rate, a very large amount of money is transferred through the stock exchanges on an hourly basis. This could generate large amounts of revenue, even if you only taxed a portion of one percent of these transactions. Is it enough to cover tuition for everyone? As a I said above, maybe. We just won't know until we try. On the subpoint of trying to eliminate trading, I don't think that will happen, indeed I don't think it CAN happen. It is an integral part of our system.

    Point 2: Do I support a payroll tax for expanding medicare to all? Yes. In fact, I would almost insist on it. Everyone gets sick eventually, so we should all pay for our fair share for when it happens. In the end, with such a large pool to control costs, it will significantly reduce our nations health care costs, and I think everyone will see the benefit from that. The only thing is, like social security, there should not be an income cap on contribution. That way the 1% still pays their fair share.

    Point 3. On Snowden. Snowden needs to take care of Snowden. Any political candidate would be committing political suicide to offer to prematurely pardon him. You are right that we have a lot of political corruption to fix, so staring at this problem instead of the corruption making it infeasible is disingenuous.

    Point 4. Israel is a military ally, and Saudi Arabi is being considered for inclusion as a military ally of the United States. It is important that our commander in chief recognize these alliances, even in light of transgressions (which must be addressed). Only a fool would turn their back on our allies.

    Point 5. I'd rather we continue drone strikes than send marines and navy seals to every hot spot. War is an ugly business, there will be collatoral damage. Drones are much more surgical than human strike teams, and put less American lives in danger. I'd rather have drones in the skies than boots on the ground.

    Post a Reply
  45. As far as drones I am on the fence but trust that Bernie would make sound and moral decisions. I just plain trust him.

    Post a Reply
  46. Why are you only questioning Sanders. Are you giving a free pass to all the other candidates. He is by far and away the most consistent of any of the candidates. He needs people in Congress that will work with him. When you ask these question of the other candidates I will answer the five questions.

    Post a Reply
  47. These are good and important questions, and IMO with the exception of #1 (because honestly, IDGAF about what professors from notoriously conservative George Mason University have to say on any topic, except to note what THE ENEMY is thinking), the answers are complex and in some cases not as flattering of Sanders as many of us would hope.
    However, all that matters in politics is the comparison. In none of the answer packages to these questions do we discover that what Sanders values and proposes is equal or inferior to what Clinton proposes. That's what matters: comparison to Clinton, period. Any discussion of Sanders out of the context of his primary primary opponent is moot.

    Post a Reply
  48. What is that weird distorted drawing of Bernie supposed to mean? Also, you are frightened of Bernie supporters & the hysteria aroun him? Stopped reading your article right there.

    Post a Reply
  49. Joann Wood How on earth can you POSSIBLY think Sanders is a Trump supporter. Or are you referring to the person who wrote this article?

    Post a Reply
  50. Questions 1 & 2 are legit, but providing single sided answers to your own questions quickly shows a potential bias; considering many economists have responded in many different ways to the same questions it would be nice to see the variety… Questions 3-5 are more observations about all the candidates with a question mark at the end; than questions directed towards Bernie's unique plans & perspectives… In my opinion he has a better track record than Bush, Trump or Clinton… Sanders seems to be the only one willing to even attempt to reign in Wall Street and overturn Citizens United, for that he gets my vote…

    Post a Reply
  51. Question 1: A modest transaction tax could cover the cost of tuition. A 2002 study suggests that a modest tranaction tax could generate around $100 billion annually so Sanders' plan seems doable.
    Question 2: A very slight increase in payroll taxes is a good idea because everyone will be contributing into this program which will in turn pay off big time for working people and families. The benefits will far outweight the costs and the 99% will see government working on their behalf for a change.
    Question 3: Bernie's position matches Snowden's position (http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/oct/05/edward-snowden-us-has-not-offered-me-plea-deal). Mr. Broze claims that Sanders is unrealistic & then claims that Snowden should be welcomed home as a hero—which is also unrealistic.
    Question 4: Not a fair characterization of Sanders' positions by the author of this piece.
    Question 5: Like it or not it seems that drones aren't going away anytime soon (http://fortune.com/2015/09/29/drones-holiday-sales/). Sanders' position is realistic.

    Post a Reply
  52. Isn't that "tax on everyone" going to be a lower amount than the minimum wage increase to $15 dollars he supports? Wouldn't someone still make more money in the end, even with paying the small increase in taxes?

    Post a Reply
  53. At present I have a Bernie bumper sticker on my car. I'm a suporter. Even though I think Bernie's weak on foreign policy (see your questions on Saudi Arabia and Israel) and I also think that his economic plan will go through severe adjustments before any of it is enacted. Presidents are not kings and have to go through long battles with Congress before anything gets done. It's why Obamacare is as flimsy as it is-although it's still better than what we had before.
    Thing is, there has never been a "perfect" candidate in my lifetime (I can see 60 looming in the distance). Unlike a lot of my friends on the left I'm willing to vote for somebody I don't agree with on everything rather than not vote at all. Democracy only works if you participate, as the man said. Do I agree with him on more things than Clinton? Yes. Do I agree with him on more things than anyone running for the Republican candidacy? Hell, yes. Bernie also has the advantage for having a core set of principles that he's been talking about for decades. He's not just saying stuff so that he can be elected.

    Post a Reply
  54. First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. -Ghandi

    Post a Reply
  55. Good questions, but none of them address why most folks will vote Sanders, which in my opinion is mostly about saving our democracy from being bought and sold to the highest bidder. Corruption of money in politics and wealth inequality overshadow the issues you raise for myself at least. I want a President and government that can't be bought off.

    Post a Reply
  56. Relative to item #2, yes, Sanders will only tax the 1%. Keep in mind that he's proposed much higher *marginal* tax rates, so if you make over $450K or thereabouts, only your income in the top marginal bracket gets taxed at the highest rate, not your entire income. The "marginal" part never gets discussed.

    Post a Reply
  57. I believe that his plans for additional tax revenue would work just fine – IF he can get laws passed. That's the biggest obstacle lately, isn't it? Good intentions are useless if they can't actually be implemented. If you vote for Bernie (or Hilary) but don't vote in any other elections than you may as well just go ahead and vote for Trump.

    Post a Reply
  58. Ad hominems, for sure, do not foster constructive dialog. Of course taxes will go up, but the percentage on lower incomes would be basically invisible. The other issues always evolve, from drone technology and targeting, to attitudes toward whistle-blowers, to attitudes toward other nations' human rights violations while we have our own issues.
    In short, there is nothing cogent in any of these "questions," and anyone can quote self-serving sources.
    The true image I am left with is the processed image of Sanders, lower teeth jutting, finger pointing, scowling, along with the plea to take the author seriously.

    Post a Reply
  59. I do believe he's referring to the banks when it comes to speculation that isn't good. Also, the tax shouldn't disincentivize the transactions it's taxing in order to produce revenue.

    Post a Reply
  60. I feel the same way on all of this. I definitely think that the opponents of ISIS in the region need to step up and fight them.

    Post a Reply
  61. Disagree over climate change, fact is with what China, India and Brazil are doing, it makes it a 2 steps forward, 3 steps back scenario. We should be doing our part for sure. Also if you don't think our foreign policy affects everything else, then you don't understand many things and one very important thing. Domestic policy is just as an important, it all can be addressed together, there need not to be an order.

    Post a Reply
  62. Which candidate would give you better answers to your questions? Being the "best" is a relative term, as long as he stays less awful than everyone else, he remains the best.

    Post a Reply
  63. Do I agree with Bernie on every issue? No.
    Do I think every aspect of his plan is fleshed out already? No.
    But I like what he stands for, what he fights for and how he goes about his business.
    That's more than I can say for nearly every politician I've seen in recent history.

    Deciding not to vote for any of the candidates is, in my opinion, the worst thing you can do.

    Someone is getting elected. This we know.

    No cadidate will ever align 100% with my beliefs (unless I'm the candidate).

    One of them surely has more overlap with your beliefs than the others. Even if it's just a little bit. There's your vote. That's the one that moves the needle in the direction you believe.

    Choosing "none of the above" is a cop out, in my opinion.

    Post a Reply
  64. I have no idea what the benefit cap is. I do know that plenty of people have paid into ss and will never see a dime of it.

    Post a Reply
  65. The logic used in this article is sophmoric. There are enough straw men here to make a decent bonfire, which we could use to burn this waste of time.
    Briefly:
    #1 Note the word "presumably" to create a position that Bernie doesn't have.
    #2 The question and the discussion aren't very well aligned and half of the question is completely non-factual (min wage has no ties to taxes)
    #3 quotes an answer to a hypothetical question, and then criticisizes the implementation of the question
    #4, #5 take complex issues, extract a portion of Bernie's record on those issues, and then throw an extremist position against the straw man created.

    Post a Reply
  66. Bernie is not warmongering when he says Saudi Arabia should get its hands dirty. It is the richest country and has an excellent army – and should be fighting against ISIS, as well as Kuwait and other rich countries in the Mideast. Why should the US help fight their battle? We should let the Mideast solve the Mideast problems. We have been in that quagmire too long as it is. Think what we could do with the money spent on war and how many we might save from becoming wounded warriors. The cases of missing limbs, blindness and brain injuries from our time in Afghanistan is staggering, not to mention those who died or have PTSD.

    Post a Reply
  67. If Sanders even accomplishes 20% of what he wants to, it will mean an improvement which is much needed. The other candidates are horrible (not even in comparison) The people need to get away from the idea that "Everything will change" and accept that Sanders is the start of something new and I think that is a really damn good thing. Who knows what can happen…

    Post a Reply
  68. Kind of a pointless article since "Bernie supporters" vary in all kinds of ways and often differ with each other not to mention with Bernie himself on some things. He's not the perfect candidate – just easily the best one from either of the 2 mainstream parties. The only perfect candidate would be me, although I imagine others might consider themselves the only perfect candidatem but since we're not running office we can afford to be brutally honest in ways acual politicins can't.

    Although I don't consider the 5 questions especially important and could find issues where I disagree more, I'll tackle it:

    1. You've totally mischaracterized the small tax on speculation by suggesting it would deter anything or that funds would dry up because there'd be far less speculation. That's a silly notion, like suggesting a 2% tax on cigarettes would put a huge crimp in that. At best, a couple of hundred people might quit.

    2. Probably not just the 1% and hope that it WOULD go further to the 2%, 3%, and probably more since our tax levels are far too low and should be closer to those of the late 50's. The payroll tax isn't my favorite method but that too would be no big disaster as many hysterics suggest would cripple the middle class, even more so if those small taxes are on those whose salaries increase greatly due to a big minimum wage increase.

    3. Snowden broke the law so let's be real and not expect a candidate to give that a free pass. Snowden's still a hero in my book and Bernie has no history of being as punitive to whistleblowers as Obama has been done so B still may be a big improvement over that, not to mention other presidential candidates who are security hawks He won't get a fair trial so I'd hope for a pardon as best case.

    4. Show me any person or politician who will succeed at totally ending U.S. funding of Israel and Saudi Arabia, epsically the former and I'll show you someone who can also walk on water. Bernie seems to be saying that WE shouldn't be fighting their wars, not that we should escalate or intervene more, so I'm not even sure what problem you have with that. I have none. The rest of your comments on this were all shoddy guilt by association garbage, that various groups have his ear.

    5. You seem to be suggesting drones should never be used under any circumstance since Bernie is already ackknowledging that the current use is abusive and should be corrected. That would be my preference too, because although some people will say they are just a tool like any other weapons system and therefore should be used sometimes, I personally find it to be a very cowardly and unethical form of warfare that should be seen as immoral as landmines. I don't know if B could be any worse than Obama has been but again, NO other candidates are looking any better on this issue.

    In the end, all the other mainstream candidates are worse on these issues (and on MOST issues), some being hideously far worse if not cretinous.

    Post a Reply
  69. FIRST THINGS FIRST;THE MILITARY CONSUMES ALMOST 60% OF THE FEDERAL BUDGET;IT IS SO BLOATED AND AND WASTEFUL;WE COULD START RIGHT THERE,

    Post a Reply
  70. ONE THING THAT SHOULD EVERY CIRIZEN SHOULD KEEP IN MIND IS THAT THE NEXT PRESIDENT WILL BE APPOINTING 2-4 SUPREME COURT JUSTICES;PLUS NUMEROUS FEDERAL JUDGESHIPS;YOU HAVE TO ASK YOURSELVES ;DO YOU WANT THE OF JUDGES THAT BERNIE WILL NOMINATE AND APPOINT OR THE KIND OF JUDGES DONALD TRUMP AND HIS ILK WILL APPOINT.

    Post a Reply
  71. When it comes to the economy and fiscal policies, I listen to actual experts. Those experts overwhelmingly support Sanders in what he has outlined. Interesting that you call for an opinion on factual matters such as these. As far as Israel, Saudi Arabia and drones; I don't support any of them. Israel suckles on our teet, S.A. is a destabilizing nation and drones have proven disasterous.

    Post a Reply
  72. Ok so my question is who would you vote for? As far as I can see Bernie Sanders is the most truthful politician we've had in years. Of course, we will see some disappointment from him being in office, but here's the thing: Sanders wants to work with the American people. This means that if there's something we don't like he'll try to make it better. What other candidate has come as close as Bernie has in working along side the people to get what we want and need in this country? None of them. He is the best candidate running right now, and the problems you're brining up are kind of asinine, considering the fact that you've brought up the problems, but where are your solutions? I can't stand it when people argue the problems but don't have any better way to fix it. And just to throw this in, a lot of the reasons why everyone would be getting hit with taxes if Sanders were to set his plan up is because this country just isn't making enough money. We're the largest consumer nation on the face of the planet, but because of that our country sees more imports than exports. We're not really making and selling things here in the US. We're buying and using things made by many other countries. This is why most everything in this country is made from China, and isn't made here in the US. We are no longer a self sufficient country and we haven't been for years. The reason why Bernie's plans won't work very well here is because this country is too damn lazy to do its own work. We'd rather have others do the work for us while we just flip the burgers and fry the fry's to make our pay. How do we help stop this problem? Tuition free colleges. That will help bring the aspiration in this country back up. Also, maybe a regulation on how many imports we can have come in a year would help things a little. If you're not going to try and help the problem an, d you're only going to state the problem then don't try putting your nose in it. All it does is cause a bunch of unnecessary rabble rousing….

    Post a Reply
  73. #1 From what I understand, the tax on Wall Street speculation would be 1/2 of 1%, so it probably would not drastically reduce specuation very much.

    Post a Reply
  74. The whole video is like "Bernie's not perfect, but only 50% great", while all other candidates with serious chance to win, are either practically a corporation (Trump) or corporate puppets (voting record & funding = what makes the real candidate). You can make the same video for any other serious candidate and adres 5 times more points that are bad for the country. Bernie's not perfect, but a damn lot better than any other serious (!) candidate if you care about the actual citizens of the USA and their safety. (food regulation wasn't adressed and I can come up with many points)

    Post a Reply
  75. Go Bernie ….. whats Hillary Clinton going to do ?? pretty much the same as the US has always had. Time to try something new.

    Post a Reply
  76. Of keep this population alive and mentally and body healthyhen it come to questionabout where He stands on humans suffering and humans needs , You will find that all the questions You postulated in this forum are leading to keep the powerful in charge of the economic , Bernie carrier has always being thruful to the people need therefore He has to make conception with those in power for the sake of the majority to get access of the necessity in this

    Post a Reply
  77. We need to stop sponsoring tyranny and oppression around the world. The only really ethical presidential candidate is Cr. Jill Stein of the Green Party

    Post a Reply
  78. Taxes wouldn't have to increase for any of the poor people if we were to tax the 1%, tax Wall-Street speculation, and legalize cannabis. The Average American would not have to see a single penny in tax increase to their paychecks if we did those three things.

    Post a Reply
  79. These are all legitimate questions – however, Bernie is the only one out of every single other candidate (including Mrs. Clinton) who is completely clear on all his positions and doesn't waffle. To me, that's the one question that matters!

    Post a Reply
  80. So his stance on these issues are further right than Hillary? He isn't perfect. He IS the best candidate.

    Post a Reply
  81. Candice Wood Romines Oh, I'm not saying I'm a fan of Hillary. BUT…I've come to the conclusion that Bernie might be able to actually be more effective as a #2 or as a new leader in the Senate. Because, really, even if he did get elected President, if you thought the Republicans were ball-breaking Obama (which they did), just you wait…

    Post a Reply
  82. Sorry, when Donald Boudreaux (Cato Institute Fellow) is pulled in as some sort of neutral observer (and the only person giving an opinion) on question 1, all sense of neutrality is completely lost. http://www.cato.org/people/donald-boudreaux

    So yes, you rightly deserve to be labelled in the manner that you protest against.

    Post a Reply
  83. Wallsteet speculation is one of the big problems that help bring in recessions. The tax is to slow down not stop the speculation something to help keep it down to a safer level.

    Post a Reply
  84. An add-on to point 2. Those of us that have good health insurance already pay between $100 – $1200 or more for a family. The price depends on your insurance, if an employer is helping you pay, and many other factors. If your medicare tax is doubled (which is more then I think will actually happen) it still save most of us money.

    Post a Reply
  85. 1. Would Bernie’s tax on Wall Street speculation work?

    Most likely as long as the tax was less than the risk payoff.

    2. Do you support an increase in payroll tax for all Americans to fund Bernie’s minimum wage and healthcare plans? Do you believe Bernie’s plans will only tax the 1%?

    I do support the tax as I believe the increase in available services is worth the cost; I believe his taxation would be more progressive as it was prior to Ronald Regan's presidency.

    3, Do you support Bernie’s comments on Edward Snowden?

    The author mentions the fairness of a trial…perhaps if Bernie is elected, that potential will be much greater. As far as being welcomed home as a hero, I agree. However, as Sanders pointed out, Snowden broke the law; not prosecuting him to some degree would encourage anarchy…we already have enough police "above the law"

    4. Do you support Bernie’s stance on Israel and Saudi Arabia? Both of these nations are responsible for atrocious human rights violations (here and here). Saudi Arabia is also accused of funding the 9/11 attacks. Despite this, the majority of politicians — including Bernie — continue to support these nations.

    That area is a complicated mess and there are no simple answer. Personally I am "Diplomacy > War" but the countries involved in these conflicts make our Congress look unified.

    5. Do you support Bernie’s plan to continue the drone program? According to documents released by a new whistleblower, during one five-month period of drone operations, nearly 90 percent of the people killed in airstrikes were not the intended targets.

    Absolutely not. The main reason I am not enamored with Obama any more, but a single policy (which will hopefully change as he gets this feedback from his constituents as he did with #BlackLivesMatter) is not enough to deter me from the rest of his idea(l)s.

    Post a Reply
  86. All good questions. For ANY candidate. Where do Hillary, Trump, Jeb!, and the rest fall on these topics? Hillary Clinton has plans for taxing Wall Street. Repiublicans generally back Israel and Saudi Arabia. I doubt the drone program will entirely disappear. Here's my question: In this season of campaign promises, why do Bernie Sanders' get held up to closer scrutiny than the other candidates? He's offering programs, solutions, like the rest. Some may work, some might not. Why should this mean he's not a viable candidate? His programs are simply different than the rest, i.e. NOT offering tax breaks to the 1% or focusing on free college as opposed to vilifying illegal immigrants. I don't think anyone believes Mr. Sanders' programs will go through without having to pay more taxes. The idea is, we'll all pay our fair share, as opposed to what's happening now where the American people pay more because the 1% and their corporations have tax loopholes and offshore bank accounts.

    Post a Reply
  87. 1. No. Simply taxing the top 1% won't work.
    2. Yes. I support an increase in the tax revenues, across all brackets (in a progressive, rather than regressive structure.) And, yes, I am personally prepared to pay more taxes.
    3. I don't know (yet). The existing whistleblower protection laws/regs should be enforced and applied, but I don't know if they would fully protect all of Snowden's disclosures, or the manner in which he revealed them.
    4. No. I would like Bernie to take a more critical stance toward Israel's policies (and it goes without saying I'm no fan of S.A.)
    5. No. I think drones should be used only for reconnaisance, not as weapons.

    In return, I have only one question for you: who are you supporting?

    If you aren't sure how to answer that, let me rephrase it: can you tell me precisely who the "anti-corporate candidate" is, so that I can support him or her, instead of Bernie?

    Post a Reply
  88. I agree for the most part with the answers others have, at the time of this writing, posted for these questions. In summary, none of these is a deal killer as far as I see. And no one else comes even close to offering the level of integrity and willingness to fight for solutions to the problems that face most of us. That being said, I want to address the author's last paragraph, kind of a non-question question. Yes, I see that Mr. Sanders is only one man. And we must do more than simply elect a good president. We need to take action to make this country what we want it to be. Sanders can set the tone, offer an agenda, even (as president ) take certain executive actions. But it is up to us, whether or not he becomes our next president, to take on the work of change. And setting up "government" as some oppressive force that is universally to be distrusted misses the fact that it is not some monolithic juggernaut wearing the face of your favorite political boogeyman. It's thousands of people, good and bad, trying to do the jobs that we've delegated them in this country. It's the largest organization we have, and I imagine most of those who work for it would rather be allies than opponents. Even cops. They are our sons, daughters, parents, and friends. It's time we stopped buying into the the political rhetoric and come together as a nation. Those who look for ways to divide us are the one we must overcome.

    Post a Reply
  89. Do gamblers not gamble because the casino takes their cut? Speculators gamble, main street covers their IOU's, tax em

    Post a Reply
  90. I have just one question for Derrick Broze: How much of a tax increase would you accept in order to send your children to college without loading them or you with crushing debt and know that you cannot be bankrupted by medical bill and to be sure that Social Security is there for you when you need it?

    Post a Reply
  91. Considering how much health insurance already costs me…. the question is "DO I give a damn about a 5% tax hike?"

    Post a Reply
  92. None of these questions can be fully answered. Not by anyone. The facts are that he has always been about the people and his actions since the 70's prove it. He does what he says and says what he does. Exactly zero of the other candidates can claim even just 10 years of doing what they say. That is all I need to know. We don't need fancy speeches, we need integrity.

    Post a Reply
  93. I am tired of voting for the lesser of two evils. Candidates bought and owned by corporations(our real leaders). Sanders presents a viable alternative to the same ole s#it

    Post a Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>