Bitcoin Survives a ‘Civil War,’ but Is It Still Doomed?

(ANTIMEDIA) — For weeks, cryptocurrency enthusiasts and investors have sounded downright apocalyptic regarding the so-called “hard fork” in the Bitcoin blockchain. Many feared that a ‘civil war’ between miners and developers over a software update would fracture the cryptocurrency into two or possibly more competing alt coins that would crash the value of bitcoin and render its tokens — painstakingly mined over the last decade — worthless overnight. However, as the crypto D-Day neared its end on August 1st, it appeared that the virtual peer-to-peer currency had not only survived its biggest challenge to date but also stood to flourish.

The original Bitcoin blockchain (BTC) did drop slightly in value but had already seen a week of gains following news of a compromise between the competing factions. The compromise birthed an entirely new currency, Bitcoin Cash (BCH), that will run on an entirely new blockchain created to facilitate more transactions.

The “fork” between BTC and BCH did not appear to have damaged the original Bitcoin in initial trading. At the end of the day on August 1st, BTC was priced at just over $2,700. Meanwhile, Bitcoin rival and the second largest cryptocurrency, Ethereum, which runs on a smart contract blockchain system, was up nearly 10%.

Meanwhile, Bitcoin Cash itself started showing signs of life on Wednesday morning with a huge spike in trading, though one cryptocurrency analyst called it an artificially inflated price.

While its short-term prospects remain strong, some still consider Bitcoin doomed to fail as the first major prototype of decentralized blockchain technology. The Segwit software update adopted by BTC, according to some cryptocurrency analysts, does not address some of the more critical problems with Bitcoin, which include slow confirmation time and transaction fees.

For many, the inherent flaws of Bitcoin’s blockchain mean that another alt coin, or perhaps several virtual currencies, will eventually rule the roost.

Creative Commons / Anti-Media / Report a typo

Since you’re here…

…We have a small favor to ask. Fewer and fewer people are seeing Anti-Media articles as social media sites crack down on us, and advertising revenues across the board are quickly declining. However, unlike many news organizations, we haven’t put up a paywall because we value open and accessible journalism over profit — but at this point, we’re barely even breaking even. Hopefully, you can see why we need to ask for your help. Anti-Media’s independent journalism and analysis takes substantial time, resources, and effort to produce, but we do it because we believe in our message and hope you do, too.

If everyone who reads our reporting and finds value in it helps fund it, our future can be much more secure. For as little as $1 and a minute of your time, you can support Anti-Media. Thank you. Click here to support us