Good Cops Cross ‘Thin Blue Line’ in Florida, Turn on Bad Cops

September 5, 2014   |   Justin King

Justin King (The Anti-Media)
September 5, 2014

browardcopsBroward County, FL – With all of the negative attention given to police officers lately, the public is left wondering if there are any good cops left. The bad apples seem to have spoiled the cart, but in Broward County several cops stepped forward to break the thin blue line in order to turn in one of their own. Image credit: Broward-Sheriff

“I’ll believe good cops exist when they start turning in the bad.”

For Broward County Deputies, that day was today. Former Broward County Deputy Eduardo Mesa is accused of stealing from a man that had been killed by a train in January. Mesa is alleged to have stolen the victim’s prescription pills.

Author’s note: Anti-Media is withholding the names of the cops that turned Mesa in to protect them from any officers who would view their actions as an assault on the thin blue line.

Detective A. reportedly saw the amber bottles of prescription pills in the victim’s possession, but the pills were never logged into evidence. Detective A. did some preliminary checking hoping that the pills had been innocently misplaced, then contacted Detective B, who obtained a search warrant for Mesa’s marked patrol vehicle. Most of the pill bottles, still bearing the victim’s name, were reportedly discovered. A warrant was issued for Mesa’s arrest.

The local criminal justice machine did not go easy on Mesa, either. He has been charged with armed trafficking in hydrocodone, possession of alprazolam, grand theft of a controlled substance, evidence tampering, and falsifying an official document. The armed trafficking charge stems from the amount of drugs that were stolen and the belief that the former deputy possessed his service weapon at the same time he possessed the narcotics.

Sheriff Scott Israel, Mesa’s former employer, seemed to have no objection to the stiff charges. He said

“When you commit a felony and you’re carrying a firearm, as I’ve said many, many times, we’re not above the law. We’re right there with everybody else.”

Armed trafficking typically carries a minimum mandatory sentence of ten years, and the amount of hydrocodone gives the charge a fifteen year minimum mandatory sentence.

This article is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to the author and TheAntiMedia.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to receive our latest articles.

Author: Justin King

Justin King joined Anti-Media as an independent journalist in July of 2014. His topics of interest include activism, human rights, international relations, and military affairs. Born in Japan, he currently resides in the United States.

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167 Comments

  1. LONG OVERDUE!!!!!!!

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  2. Good cops outnumbered by bad cops sadly that's the truth but good going good cops

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  3. Baby steps in the right direction. Hopefully these cops who chose to do the right thing will remain safe.

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  4. Awesome

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  5. Let's not start giving out awards to these "good cops" just yet. This is an isolated incident, there's still plenty of shitbag cops out there willing to overlook others wrongdoings. I'll start believing when this happens on a massive scale & most/all of the pos cops are gone.

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  6. “I’ll believe good cops exist when they start turning in the bad.”
    Remember that.

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  7. Wow, I thought I'd never hear anything like this. This is the start. Thank you for doing the right thing.

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  8. I live in Broward County. This is progress.

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  9. Disgruntled cops pissed that this guy lifted the drugs before they had a chance to lift them….or pissed that the deputy didn't cut them in on the pills.

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  10. Probably framed by bad cops. But who cares right.

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  11. I have to wonder who the good cops are in this instance. Was Mesa framed by bad cops? The entire system is broken folks

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  12. The better thing will be when we no longer need these types of stories and gsm put faith in the police again!

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  13. It's kind of sad that 2 police officers doing the right thing becomes a newsworthy event.

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  14. It used to be, in the UK, when a cop was caught breaking the law he got more time. Maybe it should be that again to discourage any lawbreaking now.

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  15. I'm still skeptical about this arrest. He might have been framed. But, if it's true, yayyyyy. He'll get more time for the pills than a murder of an innocent citizen, tho.

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  16. Trying to give the dog(public) a bone so we will go away and leave them alone is all this is.

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  17. I love to see corrupt cops being held accountable, but I actually think this guys getting the shaft. it's a victimless drug crime for one thing, and I completely disagree with the war on drugs regardless of who the victim is. although it makes me feel better to think he's probably charged other people with the same crimes before. the cop must have a drug problem, and the guy he took the pills from definitely won't miss them! of all the stories of police corruption, this is by far the most harmless i've ever heard. I just would've liked to see punishment being handed down to one of the many cops who constantly violate the constitution and brutalize people, rather than a cop who got in trouble for taking pills

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  18. Clearwater Florida is so dirty it needs some filtration now! Turn the dirty cops in now!

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  19. BUT OLIVER NORTH IS STILL A HERO COCAINE SMUGGLER ? TONS OF COCAINE AND MILLION OF DOLLARS — 1,000'S OF AMERICANS WENT TO JAIL BEHIND IT

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  20. Good to hear but as soon as i seen this i was thinking no way its a white guy and a name like eduard mesa sounds south american background but def a start

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  21. i think your right

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  22. F'kin Bravo, good sirs!

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  23. Stealing some pills from a dead body? Anyone else think this guy is a sacrificial lamb, thrown to the wolves to distract the public, while tens of millions of dollars worth of drugs are stolen every year by cops? Also, every high-security prison is rife with drugs, almost exclusively brought in by the guards. Yeah, good job 'good cop.'

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  24. huh, I guess there are good cops after all.

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  25. yep. i doubt they are "good" cops, i think they just didn't like this guy.

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  26. Dammit i hate to agree with you, but you make very valid points.

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  27. Why? There's plenty of stories in the news about cops doing the wrong thing?

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  28. I bet he is the whole jails bitch when he gets in there lmao
    Here's his asshole when he goes in—> )o( and here's his asshole when he comes out —> )O(

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  29. Good. all cop's should be good cops they shouldn't have to suspect them but they're not perfect just like citizens

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  30. Breanna JaVonne That's their JOB : enforce the law, no matter who breaks it? There is a multitude of positive stories about heroic police protecting us from bad people [who are probably NOT a threat to me at all]….ugh. You work for the Salvo evil Army? Yuck – might want to look into their political spending.

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  31. Damn it must suck to not be able to see no good in the world. Why can't you just appreciate a good story for once?? Lol aww you cared enough to check out my profile. so I guess working there means I support all their views? Riiiiiight. Fuck you, you don't know me. Why so serious

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  32. Finnally somebody positive story dirty cop is alway dirty

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  33. want to see this in real "headlines", main stream headlines.

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  34. I really thought that the best case was that I good cop was one that looked the other way but didn't break the law. I thought that the thin blue line protects all cops. It's nice to know there is at least one good department out there .

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  35. Danielle Hensley Just believe this and let go of your anger. Unfortunate, true, that cops doing the right thing should be normal and uneventful, but that's not the reality. The reality is, the system of state monopolization of security has created a corrupt and abusive agency with no regard for morality or even the law itself. So when cops do stand up, it IS newsworthy, b/c 'cops doing what they should always be doing' is not the law of the land anymore and hasn't been for a LONG time.

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  36. This is like a pebble thrown into the ocean. overall it has no effect and the waves of corruption will bury the grains of all that is good and right.. The only thing bad cops understand is a bullet in the head

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  37. It's as if we don't want to listen b/c we're not gonna like not hating cops no more. We are a genuine movement of learning about the effects of power and ending state monopolization of security … cops doing what they should be doing isn't the law of the land, to do so is to go against the machine, so drop your belligerence and support the hell out of these cops. Doing the right thing as a cop will get you fired, mocked or bullied. We need to support these individuals to inspire more to come out. Stop 'waiting' for more good cops, be a Spartan and be a man and support the few brave enough to stand, then watch as more come to reward you for your integrity. As for the rest of you cynical trolls, get out of my sight.

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  38. We should. Just like we would want cops to treat us as individuals and not 'civilians' they too would want us to treat them as individuals. No one said the problem is over, this is only a reporting of cops with integrity. They do deserve an award, considering how the state is stacked against them (good cops).

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  39. You're right man, the problem is, who was responsible for our education? The 'education' that produces an entire generation of people that obey authority without question and support the war on drugs WITHOUT ever having a REAL argument about it.

    No victim, no crime – and it's WRONG to force me to pay for your caging of people who harm themselves and no one else. But you can't have that conversation with most people – even though we have to. Pick your battles but every person we get is a turning of the tide. Revolutions are like evolution in the time span of a few generations.

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  40. I get that looting corpses is victimless but I'd like to see anyone in jail for that

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  41. It's so nice to read stories like this.

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  42. Danielle Hensley You looked at someone's profile because you didn't agree with their post? lol you are truly pathetic.

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  43. I guess it's a start, but there's MURDERS going on when do they start addressing THAT!?

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  44. No… this is EXACTLY the kind of trend we want to see stemming from all the recent negative coverage and activism… good cops being able to step into the light is a big part of what we should hope to see.

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  45. Keep up the pressure, Citizens.
    Good job. Glad the other cops took some initiative instead of just covering for one of their own.

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  46. Not a victimless drug crime. Rather it is stealing from a dead person.
    That man's possessions belonged to his family or his estate, not some greedy ahole cop.

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  47. FYI alprazolam is the generic name for Xanax.

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  48. Kelli Preuitt that's true looting a corpse is really bad. but it would be worse if he took money or valuables that should've gone to the dead guys family, cuz then there would be a living victim. taking his pills is still a pretty low class move but they would've just ended up in the trash otherwise since they can't be given to or used by anyone else legally. i definitely don't think it deserves a 10+ year sentence.

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  49. It seems a little over-the-top for stealing drugs from a dead guy, but he definitely needed to be fired at the very least. I'm betting the other cops in his department really hated him for some reason, because this is a really unusual case, especially in Florida.

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  50. He probably diddnt like the 'bad cop' for some personal reason. This just isn't reality.

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  51. You are absolutely right. The one time cops do discipline their own kind, they totally over-react and give the guy 15 years. Who wants to bet this cop was black? Or openly gay? Or maybe HE crossed the thin blue line and this is payback.

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  52. I can only assume that a LEO stealing pills from a dead man has a drug problem. That drug problem can quickly turn into a dead body in the hands of an armed individual in a blue uniform tasked with "enforcing the law". We see how that goes in other situations. I'm glad the other cops spoke up when they did.

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  53. Oh man you can bet the cop that got busted by the other was in shock with tears in his eyes. LMFAO!!!

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  54. Jacob Mason and everyone else in the convo, it says her job RIGHT NEXT to her name, as well as her state and 137 followers. Takes one second to look at it. However, Breanna does have a good point, this is a story about cops doing the right thing even against their own, and you guys are angry about it? Why? There's tons of other stories about awful cops, they're already covered. We need to read the ones like this too, to remind people that we CAN change things. It's not like there's only so many stories the internet news can publish, go pick any one about the Ferguson or NYC police if you want to read about that stuff. That should be even MORE reason to publish stories about cops doing the right thing, to set the example for the others, and remind the public that we are the ones who write the rules.

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  55. It sucks that the thing I took away from this story was, "Hm, wonder if those two, unnamed cops hated the other cop, and planted the pills in his cruiser just to screw him over." Man, you just can't trust the police, or internet stories for that matter.

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  56. Rabid Llamas Yes, but 15 years for a non-violent drug crime is not fair. He should have been fired or given a leave of absence while he underwent substance abuse treatment. Arresting people for drugs is wrong, even if they are a cop.

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  57. I agree Brian Miller, I would actually go so far as to say that with the way the police dept. is so gung ho about this guys punishment, HE probably went against the powers that be sometime in the near past

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  58. This comment has to be more noteworthy than the post itself. Bravo, sir.

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  59. Why do you feel the need to say something about where I work though? How is it "good for my college education"? I went to ONE year of school and just now going back but thanks for being so damn nosey. You don't see me making comments about your occupation. Why? CUZ IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THIS! Take your negativity to the negative stories you seem to want to read so much more instead of trying to come up with anything to bring me down. Thanks

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  60. Oh ya great they teamed up on a cop that took pulls off a dead person damn that's so horrible or maybe he was gonna turn those other cops in for something far more worse than stealing from the dead maybe it was something like those cops are drug dealers or they murdered somebody off duty because they messed with a part of there family. . Come on people that's is weak there is something fishy about this story if that all he did n I'm not saying that ain't kind of fucked up this should of never broken the code an compare it to all the other things were seeing cops are doing an r getting away with this don't even bother me it's what they're doing to the people that are n were alive before the cops got ahold of them people think … somethings not right hear..

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  61. Stolen property is a victimless crime?

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  62. That good for him ass

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  63. For starters the stiff sentence was because they believed he was possibly selling them, the pills he had stolen were pretty much heroin in pill form. But I guess distributing heroin is a victimless crime as well? Also that wasnt the only charge he is facing, tampering with evidence, falseifying a police report, grand theft (which alone gets you a minimum of 5 years) plus trafficking and whatever else they charged him with. I like how people are quick to dismiss it when good cops expose a bad cop by quickly assuming the guy must have been black or gay, or the person saying the severity of the charges were probably exaggerated because he had somehow did wrong to his superior4s in the past. Know how shit works before making yourself look stupid by speaking because its not the police department which decides which charges to procecute the guy on thats up to the district6 attorney which does not work for the police department at all, and all charges have to be investigated they dont just go to court on the word of a police officer or 2. It seems to me the ignorant people in society will have some shit to say whether a police officer does bad or good, they are damned if they do and damned if they dont. As for victimless crime this one wasnt one, its an officer who has sworn to protect and to serve and when he violates the law regardless theres plenty of victims that may have already suffered because of this guys actions or could have sufferted if he were never to have been caught. This is what he was caught doing which I would assume wasnt his first and only time doing something of this nature and who knows what he did to get ahold of pills like these before so you cant say its victimless

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  64. I'm sure there hjave been other incidents like this that just didny make the nnews though too

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  65. FINALLY! A GOOD COP!

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  66. its sad that5 all yo9u people can see is the bad in people and dont believe there is any good in the world, sad that you probably go through life looking at everyone in a negative manner, you are the same type of people that are constantly either accussing or suspectful that your spouse is cheating on you when they arrive home late from work or any minor excuse they give for anything that happens in their day. It's a pathetic way to live when you fear everyone out there is up to no good

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  67. You watch too many movies dude, and what do you want to be briefed and asked before any cop turns in another cop to make sure it meets your ok first? If you read the story they didnt set out to intentionally get the guy the cop had just noticed that the pills he had seen at the time of the incident were not logged into evidence so he confirred with another officer and they investigated it hopeing maybe they had just been missplaced but found the officer was in possession of them, so they started out giving him the benefit of the doubt but had to proceed after finding out there was criminal activity involved.

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  68. he wouldnt be put in with the general population he would be in the PC unit protected custody along wityh the child molesters and such

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  69. Why did they need a search warrant to search his marked patrol vehicle? He doesn't own it. It belongs to the department.

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  70. Movie Bader I'm flag that you think that my statement could be so far fetched.. yup I'm that you're so trusting of people that have shown us that they are not trust worthy but I wouldn't trust them add far as I could throw you or them..

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  71. Breanna JaVonne A carpenter doesn't get a news story for building a house.

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  72. Monkie Bader — It is indeed 'sad'…..that said….say you get bitten by 5 pit bulls (cops) in a relatively short span of time….are all dogs (people) suspect ? No, of course not….however, it makes sense to be cautious versus any further contact with that particular breed (cops),,,and look upon that breed (cops) as suspect. Don't blame the person who gets bit by that pit bull (cop)….it's the pit-bull's (cop's) past actions that lead one to suspect the behavior of that particular breed (cops).

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  73. Schuyler Heuser Stealing is stealing, even if the person is dead. How would you like to know that a police officer (a public servant) stole from your family member who just passed away? It isn't victimless, and it was completely fair. Its the principle of theft that matters in this case.

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  74. @Brian Miller; harmless or not, he broke the law. If it were someone else, they would be going to prison as well. What is criminal for one is criminal for all.

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  75. i was really hoping to advocate this, but a bunch of pillls??? really? what's next a sub sandwich that went missing. i'm sorry but this is not the time to break the fraternal code and rat. go to him and tell him to get help and give him a warning next time you'll turn him in. hopefully next time a story like this posts it will be for something real and not an office stapler.

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  76. At best some decent cops (dubious). At worst propaganda. Although the officer was justifiably arrested i just think it's awfully convenient timing for this story…

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  77. Get the rest of them out and maybe the people will be able to trust cop

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  78. They should do that in all precincts ! Starting from the capt on down to the pee ons

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  79. it could be a false story also. i've been seeing things like cops dancing, playing basketball with kids in the streets. they have lost there credibility with the citizens and there trust. so they are out trying to pull wool over our eye's. like a honeymoon faze

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  80. REALLY!! What bs. Im not worried about the ones using drugs but the ones training on killing innocent people

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  81. Wow! Brian miller …well said! Oh big deal , they put away a cop for taking some pills from a dead guy ….."loratab" for heaven sake! ( eye roll) thank god hes off the street now! Phew yep I guess things are really turning around against crooked cops! ( total sarcasm) I live in Florida! Its in all these cops attitude's! You have to see it , to believe it! Right down to their bogus traffic violations they pull us over for! And their hiding down side steers in our neighborhood's with radar guns! And setting up seat belt traps for those they catch not wearing them! They are out of control ! But not one if them can solve a crime! Their attitudes are the worst tho! Plus its so quiet where I live , and the police force is 3/4 of the population! Its ridiculous! They all wanna work here because they dont want to really work like cops in the big cities like Orlando or Miami! Being busted for some measly dead guys loratabs ….Really! ! Uggg such bull shit!!

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  82. Zot Ofkithairon , if there was a button for a million likes , i would hit that for your comment sir!! 🙂

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  83. Breanna JaVonne because doing the right thing is their job, it's not going beyond their duty, it is their duty, someon doing their job shouldn't be news worthy, that's what is to be expected from them

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  84. I get that, but with so many stories of bad cops wtf is so wrong with reporting on the good?? I mean this is what everybody wants right, cops turning in bad cops right? So why can't you just be appreciative? Damn whiners, can't win with y'all either way! Smh. And David, wtf are you talking about? Add what to my bucket list??

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  85. Actually David never mind answering my question, I really don't GAF what you're talking about lol

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  86. I'm impre-e-e-e-esssssed! If it's a drug crime, they throw them under the bus and throw the book at them. But if it's violence against civilians, that's another matter. Big yawn.

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  87. Breanna JaVonne Remember that one Cop that gave a pair of boots to a homeless guy? That is news worthy because that cop went way and beyond his duty. And also news worthy is the same cop who took $100 out of this wallet and bought a homeless guy a pair of boots is the same cop who shot and killed a handcuffed homeless guy

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  88. That's what I was thinking, on one hand he is being held accountable for his actions, on the other hand the only thing he did wrong was taking someone else's property, the whole drugs thing is just fucking bullshit

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  89. Arthur Kinney , he proved to be a drug dealing thief. Therefore, he shouldn't be on the force. End of story. Are you guys just mad because he was your supplier? Because, that's what it's sounding like.

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  90. So stupid busted for stealing some loratab , and zanex! I want to hear it when a partner , or another cop turns in a bad cop for false arrest , improbable cause , or brutality! !! The crap they do to innocent people , or going over board with someone they pull over for a routine traffic stop! Do u know how many times they come across drug's during the course of one shift? Everyday cops confinscate drugs off people's bodies , cars , and homes!!! They are making a big deal out of one tattle tales report!! What about all the times people are let go with a warning , and their prescription pills are taken from the cops , or weed?

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  91. I am with Breanna JaVonne on this. I like to see stories about cops doing the right thing. To obtain true harmony, there must be balance. This story provides just a little balance. Kudos to Detective A, whoever you are. You have my undying respect for doing your job the right way.

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  92. Sorry… Disagree with you… You know full well this same guy has probably brutalized the daylights out of people for doing precisely what he did. Now maybe he can get a taste of what it's like for the poor boobs he has gone after for the same dumbass "crimes." This is a taste of his own medicine.

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  94. Monkie Bader i gotta admit you make a couple good points, you may have even changed my mind. but you also make a couple dumb points, too. to start with, yes selling heroin (or any drug or any THING sold to an adult who knows what he's getting) is a victimless crime. the person selling heroin isn't doing anything worse than the person selling fast food. (of course i'd make an exception for the rare case in which some horrible person decides to sell to a child or someone who doesn't know better just so they can get them addicted and turn them into a repeat customer. anyone that does that deserves to rot in prison. but that's not what happens, 99.999999999% of transactions are between 2 consenting adults who know exactly what they're doing. the buyer is responsible for his own decisions, if you call him a victim then every fat person who eats fast food is a victim including me! but that's ridiculous)

    However, I do believe in general that police should be held to a higher standard than the average citizen and should face very serious punishment for ANY crime at all. ESPECIALLY if they are caught tampering with evidence or falsifying reports. I've always thought those should be considered some of the worst, most harshly punished crimes in existence. considering the amount of trust and power that is given to those reports in court, no tampering should ever be tolerated at all (unfortunately we all know that police falsify reports on the regular. they make up smells or whatever will help in court without a second thought). for taking the pills i think it would be more appropriate to fire him than to give him any jail time. But for the falsifying charges, i gotta admit you may be right the jail time kinda fits.

    given that his false report was only done to cover up the pill theft, rather than trying to cover up an unjustified beating or shooting, i still wouldn't condemn him quite as much as i would the more violent cops who seem to constantly get away with filing false reports and lying on the stand. the prosecutor never seems to care about the violent ones even when there is video proof that their report and their actions were bullshit

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  95. My sentiments to. The drug statutes are total crap, and the victim was already dead. Smacks of simple grandstanding. Will they turn on other cops for illegal searches and seizures that are used to illegally enforce these illegal statutes (I won't dignify such by calling them drug 'laws')

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  96. Rabid Llamas – the only 'drug problem' really are the illegal statutes against drugs. We don't say a person has a 'drug problem' if it is say alcohol or nicotine.

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  97. your right but the way you make them see how ridiculous the drug war is is by putting their ass up in their ludacrious bs…hows that taste in your mouth punk bitch cop~

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  98. Although I believe the amount of cops doing the right thing far outweighs the few doing the wrong thing, I'm all for coos who do wrong to be held accountable. But 15 years seems a bit much.

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  99. while I can totally understand and fully appreciate your perspective, [the charges are] also just for a few reasons. One – it is just because they are in fact the same laws that civilians are held to, aggravated by the fact that he's supposed to be the one enforcing said laws. Two – it is an unsupported assumption that he has a drug problem. He may instead be selling them, which would compound the issue further if true. Aaaaand even if he does have a drug problem, it is a very dangerous problem for a man with a gun, exposed to stressful or life/death situations on the daily, to have. Dangerous for evveryone.
    But I agree we should fix those laws, and indeed we should hear more about the ones who violate the constitution get brought before their former peers as suspects to be tried.

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  100. Schuyler Heuser I'd agree with saying rehab and maybe some probation would be a fair deal, but that's not what citizens get. Those laws affect citizens, too, and the cops never had a problem sending those people to jail. Now, one of their own gets to see what it's like. "This is what we've been doing to people we arrest for having lots of drugs? Well, damn. Maybe the drug war is stupid."

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  101. So ok they told on the cop great, but his name is Eduardo mexican and Florida is known for racism so until I see it happening to white cops thats still a bias and still racial stemmed or influence to me.

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  102. Rabid Llamas Just because citizens would get the same, doesn't mean that citizens SHOULD get the same. And cops should be treated the same as regular people. All you people saying that he was a drug-dealing thief… Look, the guy was dead, he's not gonna miss it. The man's family isn't going to use it. There was NO evidence that he was selling it, and as for "grand theft of a controlled substance?" There is no way that man had enough pills on him to be worth over $1000. Their value is estimated by the police, and they always over-estimate. I'd be very surprised if you could have sold everything he stole for more than $300, and that's even a stretch. That shit isn't worth THAT much.

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  103. You're missing the point. The OFFICER OF THE LAW stole articles from a crime scene. Not only that, he stole from a dead man which is predatory. Also if they're charging him for possession of Xanax as well, it means that's another controlled substance that apparently isn't in his name – who did he steal that from? Every police department has drug rehab programs; he just needed to ask for help. Police MUST be held to a higher standard BECAUSE they have the ability to end lives through accusations (charges) or actions (weapons) – if they're not on top of their game and either start abusing their authority or are intoxicated or withdrawing from drugs and make the wrong call, they are a danger to society. This is not a "victimless crime" as you call it because this officer puts everyone as risk.

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  104. @Monkie Bader Distributing heroin IS a victimless crime. Stealing from the dead IS a victimless crime. You're applying the same standards of judgement to this man as cops do to normal citizens, and they are very unreasonable standards. Yeah, he's a cop, but he's still a human being, and this is no way to treat human beings. Whenever someone tries to make an argument based around the idea, spoken or unspoken, that a certain person is less than human, they are doing a disservice to humans everywhere. And do you think that cops would have REALLY turned him in and brought the hammer of the law down THAT HARD if he fit in and was a normal cop? Thats like thinking there is a gigantic tea-pot orbiting the sun in just such a way that we can't see it. Its theoretically possible, but its a completely ridiculous notion. I DO know how shit works. You clearly do not.

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  105. Schuyler Heuser "Monkie Badger"? You can't even have a discussion without patronizing and name calling? Okay, since we're no longer having a civil discussion, first off, fuck you, and second distributing heroin, is NOT a victimless crime BECAUSE your buyers are your victims; possessing heroin for personal use IS a victimless crime because. The fact you can't understand the difference is highly telling of your inability to evaluate facts clearly. Stealing from the dead is NOT a victimless crime, because even though they're dead, you can still abuse and victimize them as the dead still have rights – which is exactly why you can't simply take organs from a non-donor corpse even when there is a need.

    Cops make an explicit promise and a legal oath to uphold the law – they ACTIVELY CHOSE to hold themselves to a higher standard. It doesn't matter if he "fit in" or not, you're just trying to excuse away his behavior.

    But ya, done debating with my intellectual inferiors on the internet today.

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  106. These kinds of story how rare they might be make me feel good to be an American.

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  107. I don't who this blog thinks they are fooling. He will go on paid leave, go to drug treatment and be back on the force in 6 months.

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  108. This is the way to restore trust and respect in local law enforcement.
    Keep up the good work! We need more honest cops on the force.
    Now if other LEOs will follow suit.
    Until then, we the people are watching you cops, while you cops are watching we the people.
    Don't forget that and don't forget to smile for the cameras.
    🙂

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  109. This is not a step in the right direction. A real break through will be when they testify against each other for violating our rights and police brutality. Cops will turn on each other so quick when it comes to drugs. Once they discovered he was an addict he was no longer one of them. 25 years of charges for this? How about getting him help. Not punishing an addict because of what his job is and because he's a cop they went super hard on him. Yet the cops that beat Kelly Tomas to death didn't do a single day in jail. What's wrong with this picture? So the "war on drugs" is more important then a war on human rights violations?

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  110. if you're going to cross the thin blue line throw some big fish on the fire not just a little ones

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  111. Hancock County, Illinois could use some looking into. I have been falsely imprisoned forced to sign confessions I never wrote, thrown in prison released from prison for stopping a crime in progress while in work release and the whole time I was there I never even got one ticket and when your in prison that is impossible they say considering you can be ticketed for reckless eyeball movement, had people commit crimes against me at the request of police and when police were called I was told to shut up or I would be arrested, had to move out of county and they even crossed out of their county 3 times to come beat my ass had to hide my own family to protect them. A judge in Adam's county dined me the right to a jury trial and fined me 750 dollar's for 2 dogs that weren't even mine even though the owners wrote a notarized letter stating this fact. What else is there to do when faced with so many corrupt so called Authorities? Seriously I want to know where the shit stops? My kids are terrified of police and if they see one they panic not because of being taught by me or my wife but because they have seen for absolutely no reason at all these Police seem to only enjoy killing and inflicting harm nothing will ever change that now. I am disabled I can't fight back physically and my spine is only getting worse by the way it's screwed with rods pins brackets with 3 different ruptures in spine. Sorry this is not perfectly typed and formatted but the story's would have took for ever to type.

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  112. The dude obviously did something to piss off the "Blue Line" and they turned on him. Rats do that to each other, it's bound to happen when you're dealing with the lowest common denominator of society…they commit MURDER on a regular basis and I'm supposed to get worked up over them giving up one for pills? GTFO Until they start really making changes, like honoring our right to travel unmolested, or realizing the CITIZEN going home at the end of the night is what is important, not them. They volunteered for the fucking job and the risks that come with it, not the citizen. Cops are nothing more than pirates and killers. Fuck them all. ACAB

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  113. This is just more injustice. This cop is getting 15+ years for a nonviolent victimless crime, while the cops who beat, shoot, and kill people get nothing.

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  114. Never ever trust any source that covers up for anyone. That's just plain and simple logic. I used to think this site was a good form of new media but now I'm highly suspicious of it for posting such an apologist story and covering for the alleged "good cops" for turning someone which they were hired and expected to do there iz no need for praise. If there iz no data available for the reader to verify the story to begin then be very aware of the ones sharing it. Hope for what? The police state to fix itself? Are you kidding? This site iz hereby on notice.

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  115. It is sad that this officer's main criminal charge is because of carrying a weapon while stealing drugs. Carrying a weapon not being used to assault anyone is not a crime but a right. This charge is as bogus as saying "you are guilty because you were standing next to a street robber." Having a "drug" is only a dictatorial "law" that the masters have imposed on their slaves (see history of drug criminalization in the US and how government used the newly created IRS —another unconstitutional government agency— to make drugs illegal). The real and only charge that would hold in a common-law court would be stealing private property. Evidently government does not want people to start thinking that private property is really the basis for any real crime, since government is the first one to steal from everybody (income taxes, property taxes —as if they own YOUR property—, concealed weapon licenses —why not tax free speech too?—, etc.) Evidently the whole article and charges are based on bogus, non-common-law dictatorial (statutory) laws created by politicians who, let's face it, most of us never entered into any contract for them to violate our preexisting social agreements (a.k.a. natural rights)…

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  116. That's not "good cops" turning in bad cops. There are certain things cops and police departments usually will not tolerate from other cops. Stealing, rape, etc. But when it comes to police brutality and murder under color of law, they all believe that's their job.

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  117. So what? That was Mickey Mouse stuff. Where are the stories of so called "good" cops arresting cops for beating up people? Where are the stories of "good" cops arresting a cop for arbitrarily shooting some one's dog in the dog owner's yard? Where are the stories of "good" cops arresting cops for violating some one's 4th Amendment right at a traffic stop or while a person is walking down the street, etc, etc, etc????

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  118. Sounds fishy to me. ..

    I find it more likely that the cop busted was actually the good one set up by the bad ones.

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  119. His cops aren't above the law. LOL Yeah, right. This cop got busted, because he was dealing drugs on the side and not giving the profits to the sheriff. Broward county police and sheriff departments are the areas biggest drug dealers. It's common knowlege that the police in Dallas, where I'm from, is the biggest drug dealing organiztion in the entire DFW area, seconded only by the Fort Worth police. Drug dealing, child trafficking, prostitution, you name it. The cops in every city police force are doing it.

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  120. I suspect that this kind of theft is likely routine in many police and fire departments as they have many opportunities to steal cash and other valuables from the dead…I wonder if the cops who reported the theft are themselves truly squeaky clean or if they just had it in for the person they turned in? There really needs to be a thorough investigation.

    Wouldn't it be great if cops started turning each other in for brutally abusing civilians?! Then I'll believe the "thin blue line" has been crossed. Or am I being overly cynical?

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  121. Just wondering what Mesa did to get these othere officers to turn on him? This wasn't a case of "good" cops vs bad. I think it will end up being more like he didnt tow the line so they got rid of him.

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  122. Good job to the cops who do the right thing… but when you think about it, isn't it ridiculous that this is newsworthy?

    What would happen if a McDonald's employee made the news every time he served you a burger?

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  123. This is actually very refreshing. Too bad the names weren't released. I would congratulate them.

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  124. Well, you know what they say… It takes just nearly all cops to ruin the reputation of the 1 or 2 good cops still out there.

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  125. Of course to read neurologist Carl Hart's fine book, we will find that neither the original "owner" of these prescription narcotics nor the silly policeman deserve a 15 year prison sentence. The Drug War rips off the taxpayers beyond belief.

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  126. "Mesa"? He's likely Hispanic or "other" to the white boys – that's probably why they got religion and turned him in.

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  127. This officer mesa will be back on the force in no time with back pay thats how this shit works.

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  128. I hope this is as it seems. Is there a chance that the officers who reported Deputy Mesa had it in for him because he's Latino/Mexican/Spanish or similar? Were any of the officers who reported him of the same ethnic background as him or were they all Caucasian? Racism is rife within the police. I hope this isn't the reason behind their actions. If it's not then well done for doing the right thing.

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  129. Maybe this is a clue that more and more people in positions of power will take a stand for decency and valiance. Salutes to Detective A and B!

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  130. He hasnt been convicted yet though. Which means a publicity, and at the very worst. They'll give the mother fucker probation.

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  131. This is the true measure of a "good cop" — that is, when he or she is willing to cross that "thin blue line" and enforce the law on BOTH sides of it. The system is broken, and that thin blue line is one of the reasons it is broken. The only way the system can get fixed is if the good cops fix it. All we can do is demand accountability, and for the good cops to enforce it.

    This ONE report is a tiny step in the right direction. The real measure of change, however, will be when the good cops enforce the law (that is, the Constitution) against cops who beat up on, taser, pepper spray, and kill citizens (including CHILDREN) who haven't even broken the law, or, even if they HAVE broken the law, have not posed any real threat to the lives of officers.

    BTW, I did a very extensive statistical analysis of the claim that line of duty fatalities among police officers occur once every 58 hours — which turns out to be "technically" correct, but they are extremely misleading. I look closely at the following facts:

    1) These LOD fatalities include fatalities due to traffic accidents and "work related illnesses," among other causes that don't involve a criminal committing homicide against a cop;

    2) LOD fatalities (including traffic fatalities) have been dropping precipitously since 1989, with one big uptick in 2001 (because of 9/11), to the point that in the past two years combined it actually amounts to 1 every 112 hours, not 58;

    3) When you look at dangerous occupations in general, law enforcement doesn't even make the top 10 (loggers, fishers, steelworkers, construction workers, and farm workers, among others DO make that top 10);

    4) When you look at the RATE of LOD officer deaths for all causes (that is, deaths relative to the population of LEOs in general), you find out that the rate of LOD fatalities for ALL CAUSES per 100,000 is significantly LOWER than the rate of death by HOMICIDE ALONE in the general population (4.5 vs. 5.6) — in South Dakota, where the rate of LOD fatalities is the highest. Which means the rate of LOD fatalities in other states, and in the nation as a whole, is even lower.
    Thus you are far less likely to die by homicide if you are a cop than if you are Jill or Joe Shmoe.

    As my dad would say, "Put that in your pipe and smoke it!"
    hhttps://www.facebook.com/editnote.php?draft&note_id=10152334222960756&id=1637032732

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