How Popular Music’s Lyrics Perpetuate American Idiocy

May 20, 2015   |   Claire Bernish

Claire Bernish

(ANTIMEDIA) A recent study served to confirm the patently obvious: song lyrics for the most popular genres of music are ridiculously obtuse — and getting worse over time. Though this might not be a revelation, the figures are distressing indicators of both an intellectually vapid societal and cultural future as well as its apparent inevitability.

If you’ve already moved away from Billboard music, congratulations, you refuse to be insulted. But if you haven’t, or if you’re concerned about pop culture trends acting as portents of systemic dysfunction, you should probably pay attention. Andrew Powell-Morse of SeatSmart studied the “Lyric Intelligence” of 225 Billboard songs in the Pop, Country, Hip-hop, and Rock genres that spent three or more weeks parked at the top of the charts to analyze any changes over the course of ten years. And change there was.

Ten years ago, the most popular songs read between a third and fourth grade level, but the inanity only increased with time, and after a five-year downward tumble ending in 2014 (the last year of the study), chart-topping hits had a reading level equivalent to second or third grade. Broken into genres, the levels measured just 2.6 for Hip-hop/R&B, a tie of 2.9 for Rock and Pop, and faring best was Country at 3.3 — though declaring a winner in this insipid race to the bottom seems somewhat defeatist. Even further to that point, the most intellectually stimulating song, Blake Shelton’s Country hit “All About Tonight”, measured just 5.8, while wading deeply into the ludicrous was Three Days Grace’s “The Good Life”, at a level equivalent to 0.8 — begging the question, did they have to try to craft lyrics a kindergartner could easily read?

So how did this happen and why is it getting even worse? For the sake of brevity, this is a systemic issue being reinforced across the board by pandemic anti-intellectualism. Some have argued there is no harm in a bit of mindless distraction, but this is incontrovertibly false. When just six corporations control 90% of the media, and 80% of radio stations have identical playlists, mindless content isn’t a choice — it’s a virtual mandate. In this self-propelled cycle of banality, the conglomerates dictate content to be promoted by radio, which in turn pushes it endlessly, creating a false perception that what is being played is due to listener demand. But this insidious marketing ploy is more akin to kidnapping and is every bit as dangerous.

There is a dearth in music options over the airwaves, so when vacuous lyrics are foisted on listeners, they become captives under duress. It is scientifically proven that flexing the intellect can slow cognitive decline, but there has been a cultural shift away from stimulating thought in favor of homogenization and living for the moment, and empty radio content is both symptom and reinforcement of that trend. Society is focused on entertainment, materialism, and self-promotion, and when coupled with a need for instant gratification, it’s really no wonder we’re in such a sorry state. Occasional forays into mindless distraction would be understandable and harmless if they were just forays, but the foundation is faulty due to a sharp decline in quality education at every level.

Education has become the highest form of indoctrination with teachers forced into regurgitating information so their students can pass tests rather than become innovators and original thinkers. And who could blame them? Currently, they’re held to the ridiculous system where their performance is ranked, and salary determined by how those students perform on standardized tests that are, themselves, flawed. As Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, put it, “This country has spent billions on accountability, not on the improvement of teaching and learning at the classroom level.”

An education system based almost solely on taking tests is not only intellectually dimming, it’s stressful — instructors doling out the tests are given a set of instructions for what to do when students vomit on their test booklets. All of this is designed to send students to college where the situation is perpetuated. According to Catherine Liu, a film and media studies professor at the University of California, “We don’t educate people anymore. We train them to get jobs.”

Listen: ‘Reagan’ by Killer Mike on Anti-Media

From a political standpoint, all this ‘dumbing down’ makes sense: indoctrination creates obedience. If music and culture focus on mindless diversion, and education lacks, well, education, then people lack the acuity necessary to question the absurdity of the system. Those who manage to liberate themselves from this mold and have the gumption to question official authority will find a cozy spot on the government’s watch list. So while we bemoan our country’s lack of intellectual prowess, it isn’t by a failure of design.

The author of aptly titled Idiot America, journalist Charles Pierce, thoroughly summed up the issue this way: “The rise of idiot America today represents–for profit mainly, but also and more cynically, for political advantage in the pursuit of power–the breakdown of a consensus that the pursuit of knowledge is a good.”

Unfortunately, if the lyrics study is a prognostic omen, the epidemic of idiocy will only get worse.


This article (How Popular Music’s Lyrics Perpetuate American Idiocy) is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to the author and TheAntiMedia.org. Tune in! The Anti-Media radio show airs Monday through Friday @ 11pm Eastern/8pm Pacific. Help us fix our typos: edits@theantimedia.org.

Author: Claire Bernish

Claire Bernish joined Anti-Media as an independent journalist in May of 2015. Her topics of interest include thwarting war propaganda through education, the refugee crisis & related issues, 1st Amendment concerns, ending police brutality, and general government & corporate accountability. Born in North Carolina, she now lives in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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131 Comments

  1. I always remind people of "Don't Sleep under the Apple Tree". Not all pop songs of the past were all that deep

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  2. The music industry is mainly interested in making money. Today they seem to care less about the content of what their artists put out just as long as it reaps a big profit!

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  3. America is a very sick country. Everything is designed to reduce individual choice and freedom in favour of creating unquestioning consumers who will buy/ do whatever they're told through media/advertising. It's like the 60s never happened.

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  4. Only one problem with all this but it's a massive one: any chance of discovering the parameters, what's being measured, how judgements are being made, in other words what's the scientific basis for it? No links, no corroboration? Sorry but something as controversial as this needs backup. Otherwise it's just another bloody internet opinion piece and those are a waste of time. Expected more from you anti media. Very disappointed

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  5. I don't think the grade levels are equal anymore. My 7 year old grandson knows more now than I did when I was 7.

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  6. Neolani Lynn Perry I guess you need your articles to be at kindergarten reading level too lol. You've successfully proven the point of the article

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  7. Lol how about "splish splash I was taking as bath" from the fifties? It was mainly in the 60's and 70's when we had our musical high-point.

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  8. Living on a lighted stage
    Approaches the unreal
    For those who think and feel
    In touch with some reality
    Beyond the gilded cage

    Cast in this unlikely role
    Ill-equipped to act
    With insufficient tact
    One must put up barriers
    To keep oneself intact

    [Chorus:]
    Living in the limelight
    The universal dream
    For those who wish to seem
    Those who wish to be
    Must put aside the alienation
    Get on with the fascination
    The real relation
    The underlying theme

    Living in a fish eye lens
    Caught in the camera eye
    I have no heart to lie
    I can't pretend a stranger
    Is a long-awaited friend

    All the world's indeed a stage
    And we are merely players
    Performers and portrayers
    Each another's audience
    Outside the gilded cage

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  9. So. You're concerned about the Flesch-Kincaid reading level of the written lyrics of pop songs? And. Why? They're not for reading. Flesch-Kincaid is one of many scales, and it's based on algorithms that don't necessarily apply to what makes good pop lyrics. This is the dumbest thing I've ever seen. Complete garbage. Lol.

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  10. Now I'm going to listen to some Kanye to get my brain working again. Reading this hand-wringing drivel just made me dumber. Ew ew ew.

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  11. all the comments I'm reading just highlight how accurate this article is. Why have intellectual stimulation when most people would rather stare at their smart phones and hum the latest 3 bar unoriginal pop crap instead of supporting a thriving intellectual culture. Or to put in laymans terms, y'all are dumbing everything down with your lazy self centered attitudes. *cue the trolls*

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  12. Jay, I don't think many of these commentors are going to understand. Rush is intelligent and thought provoking. If only we still had groups like this, I might actually turn the radio on again. 🙂

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  13. I've been saying this for years. The quality of music is down the toilet, and the lyrics are inane. It's all a materialistic thug-fest. Designer crap, songs that encourage kids to be as shallow as you can imagine, and the worst is that all of it heavily encourages them to go along with trends, accumulate money and possessions, and grab power. No deep thought in the lyrics anymore. No one musing about life, meaning, or the future. Just flash and repetitive nonsense.

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  14. They're writing an article on how pop music and it's infantile lyrics is suppressing intelligence in today's society. How the fuck did you want them to write the article? Like a goddamn five year old? Jesus… Reading the comments, some of you people have the stupidest complaints towards this article.

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  15. Celeste Meginheide Weninger Groups like this do still exist. Unfortunately most will never be played on the radio.

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  16. Take a look at pop music lyrics from the 1950's. Talk about vapid. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

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  17. Wayne Stadler Fewer and further between than ever. A lot of the stuff that isn't on the radio and is highly regarded still strikes me as ignorant pap. Musically and lyrically.

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  18. Wayne Stadler It may have been sarcasm, but it was sarcasm directed at the article and its intent. That IS dumb.

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  19. Which just shows that you aren't very bright. I'm in my mid 50s and there isn't a kid on the planet who is 7 and knows more than I did when I was 7.
    I was gifted. You're just dumb.

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  20. I think it's funny and sad you wrote a piece about anti-intellectualism and then misused the phrase "begging the question".

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  21. If you jam the airwaves with idiocy, you drown out those with something to say.

    In modern times, revolutionaries and music have often gone hand in hand, and music has often been the medium of delivery for the message.

    Join the dots.

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  22. If the author were trying to reach out to the average radio listener, I'd have to assume that the author wouldn't have tried to use their extended vocabulary to appeal to an already interested culture.

    Just my opinion, but sometimes using too many verbose characters really flushes the attention from the article instead of getting the point across to targeted audiences.

    In any sense, it was a great article to read and I'd like to read more if they'll continue to cover it.

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  23. Celeste Meginheide Weninger I think Wayne has it right. There are groups that still exist like that, you just have to go 'outside the box' to find them. Tommy is on the right track. It really comes down to social engineering.

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  24. 2 of the 3 pop stars used above to illustrate this article are not American. Pop music may be dumbing down our culture and Americans in particular may lead the world in this trend but a culture of idiocy is a global issue in a global culture and economy dependent on the indifference of its citizens to conditions for affluence they would otherwise object to: outsourced slave labor, pollution, animal cruelty, military action and the interrelationship between political and corporate authorities.

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  25. not surprised that music is free then eh? who buys it? be poud own up….what music do you buy?

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  26. Um…Yeah..Me got a sharp pain in the brain while I was reading this. I think I'll listen to some retarded music to make it feel better.

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  27. Um…Yeah..Me got a sharp pain in the brain while I was reading this. I think I'll listen to some retarded music to make it feel better.

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  28. Spike Hyzer People who have to resort to insults like this speak volumes about their character and it doesn't matter how much "intelligence" you think you have.

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  29. Spike Hyzer You are just a bundle of JOY. Someone must have peed in your cheerios. Stuff that still strikes you as ignorant pap might be for a reason other than the music actually Being ignorant pap. It mmight have something to do with you, hmmmmmm

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  30. Oh my lord lighten the hell up Connor. The whole point if making the article so verbose was to prove the point. Laugh a little and get the corncob out of your butt and put it on the grill. Its Independendence day weekend.

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  31. Absolutely SPOT on!

    Please listen to a couple of these guys songs, intelligent people like urself may appreciated tunes that seek to dismantle the global amnesia

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  32. Well I tried to delete this post because it was arse. There is a link in the text sorry anti media

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  33. Ah man, Rush. They have some of the most thought-provoking lyrics I've heard, even in their 80's synthesizer/pop sort of sounding phase.

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  34. 1. This artical was so wordy that it did what it was preaching about. It completely distracted you with flashy signs and his the real meaning
    2. There is no meaning or point. Music or the lyrics hasn't dumbed down. Lots of great lyrics are being written with lots of catchy melodies and sounds that make you feel a certain way. Dumb simple lyrics have always been written since the dawn of pop music. Dont Mean A Think If It Ain't Got That Swing is no different than the modern track of Just Dance by GaGa. So shut up and just listen to music that you like.

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  35. "Don't wanna be an American idiot, don't wanna nation controlled by the media."
    -Greenday American idiot.

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  36. You are very right. Their "freedom" was created to bring back the civilized human back to primitivity. It comes with a cost. Freedom-ness makes them think that even media has the right to say anything, but that's not actually the case. Living in US since 2012, I see people watching the manipulative TV unveils modified information. It's like they're not trying to inform you, but they're planting a seed with their opinion with the cinematography and presentation. Sad. Even sadder that citizens were blinded by who-knows-what.

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  37. Remember that term "Question Authority" that was so popular in the 60s? It's now no longer acceptable according to the people FROM the 60s who are now the power elites.

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  38. Thank you for posting this. You saved me the time and trouble. Rush in Denver July 11!

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  39. Schecky Schmengberg Wow you sound like a jerk. this article was fairly bogus.

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  40. I don't find anything about this article funny. Maybe that's your problem, everything's not a joke. I know my education was watered down, do you? We have enough wanna be comedians in America. We as a society are a joke right now and people saying "take it easy" or "laugh a little" are part of said problem not part of the solution.

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  41. Lamb of god and others like it touch on these subjects. Very talented as well. Unearth too.

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  42. It would be interesting to see a reading level analysis of heavy metal lyrics averaged over like say, 100 bands, or 100 albums or something. I know Metallica's …And Justice For All has a very good vocabulary.

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  43. I'm a teacher in Australia and we follow the American model. It frustrates me that we do this because I think that Australians by nature are lateral and innovative in their thinking and therefore should design their own curriculum approach and standards geared toward our collective style. It is my critical view of the modern system, which began with the introduction of the "Curriculum Standards Framework" many years ago, that talented students who are going to excell in any environment, are well facilitated and extended, while the vast majority labour behind. The gap between the two is ever increasing and as a result there are less and less students in the area between the high achiever's and the middle of the road students. That's not only my opinion.

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  44. If you know where to look there is still some thought provoking music. You just can't turn on the radio to hear it. A lot of metal bands actually have great messages. Listen to erra if you want a good example.

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  45. John Howell, Hi John, I understand your frustration. But such sweeping statements are always wrong. They will do nothing to further your cause. They will not result in people with good ideas coming together. The "us versus them." mentality is being used on us every day. They know they can not conquer us unless we are divided. That is where our freedom to choose not to be divided will come in handy.

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  46. The government is slowly dumbing down the country so they can reign over us like the overlords they are!

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  47. It would make more sense to use words in your audience's vocabulary. Especially if you actually want your article to make any kind of difference. I would make a second article using simpler words then link it to this one with a caption, "i dont know these words". If only to prove to the reader that they've been dumbed down.

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  48. It's not just the lyrics in songs. The dumbing down of not just the American culture but of all cultures is being accomplished through television, newspapers, movies, the internet and on and on and on. When i wrote a sports column for a small town newspaper in high school, I was told to write at an eight grade level or lower and my editor would constantly break up complex sentences, using three to four word "statements" instead. Working with my editor on my children's book, we decided to go up the ladder a bit and used words commonly found in 6th-8th grade vocabularies and the book is intended for 3-6 year olds.

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  49. While this article may have merit, you have to also remember that music is art. It does not have any social responsibility. The artists do not need to have meaningful words, just… words… (Come to think of it, the song, "Three Blind Mice" is a song about animal cruelty against three helpless blind mice who have unwanted surgery with the removal of their tails. No uproar about children singing that!).

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  50. There has been "uneducated" music just as long as there has been "smart" music. There will always be artists out there who wish to challenge people. The problem is most people don't want to be challenged. Don't blame these artists for giving the public what it wants. Blame the public.

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  51. Damn kids these days with their music and those clothes and that hair . . .

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  52. Please learn what "begging the question" is before you whine about something else's grade level.

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  53. James Joyce's "Ulysses" scores a 3.8. Just slightly "smarter" than country music. Langston Hughes' "Theme for English B" got a 2.8, smarter than hip-hop but dumber than rock.

    I'm thinking that using a tool designed for prose to evaluate poetry is a fatally flawed methodology.

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  54. It was just you. I thought this was a brilliantly written article. Honestly, your comment is proof of what he's trying to say.

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  55. This is easily the worst written article I've seen in years which is saying something. A thesaurus is not a 'dumb to smart' translator. Especially when you don't know how to use the words properly. You can paint masterpieces with a limited palette (Hemingway) but throwing paints from a more complex color scheme on a canvas without skill(like the author of this article) usually doesn't produce much more than a mess.

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  56. This is a bit bloody pretentious don't you think? Yes the issues addressed later in the article on education are valid, however is it necessary to also shit on people musical taste? You say that the lyrics of most billboard songs read at the level of at worst 2nd grader and at best a clever 5th, but how is that a relevant assessment of the artistic intellect when you're grading a song like an essay. I think you forget that music is about expression, and given the convention that music is generally supposed to be catchy or sound good, the artist is fairly limited in their use of vocabulary. You've written a very verbose article here which I'm sure would stand up great in your "lyric intellect" test, but I would like to see you put such a mouthful to a melody or rhythm and have people enjoy it. Furthermore, is popular music really is just a tool to brainwash the masses, what would you have us listen to? Some thought provoking slam poetry? Or perhaps just more of your articles read by a velvety voiced narrator? If you're too cool (or 'woke') I believe the term is, for popular music then good for you on you're musical enlightenment, bit don't shit on others just for enjoying what's on the radio, Christ.

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  57. i was going to leave a critism but it seems this article was eviscerated very quickly. XD

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  58. I very much agree with this article (though to be fair too, I come from a media criticism b/g myself).
    There's A LOT of music out there – why is it the vapid stuff that gets the most radio play? Of course, there are plenty of more "intellectually" stimulating music out there with mainstream recognition (and in all genres!!), but to me, it's problematic that it's the "idiot" stuff that continues to sit at the top of the water of media, celebrated at Grammy's, and bought in Platinum sales.

    Sociologist and musicologist Theodor Adorno was very critical of this kind of very thing in the 40's. He criticized "pre-digested" pop music (you may've never heard a song before, but you'll very quickly know how to sing along to it, because you've heard others just like it), the illusion of "different" choices (remember N*SYNC vs Backstreet Boys?), and what he coined the "culture industry" – pop culture junk entertainment meant to distract and pacify you, and drown the voices of others.

    It's problematic when a magazine like Rolling Stone (once about rock music) celebrates Kim Kardashian on one of their most recent covers, MTV (once about music videos) plays reality shows like Jersey Shore… Top 40 music is a reflection of just that kind of dumbing cultural paradigm. I don't really mind it that the content is out there, but this stuff dominates in a way that pretends nothing else exists, and that it's somehow so culturally important.
    I think The Onion did a perfect satirical critique on dumb pop music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmCjJ0VBjjU

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  59. Expression can't be eloquent? Art can be measured by depth.

    Maybe "scribbles" have for some weird reason been embraced by visual art as "modern," but the impressionist painting a huge landscape is still objectively doing more work and brings more talent to bear.

    You obviously have not delved into alternative music. Or just past music in general. It sounds plenty good. (Besides, anything is "catchy" when repeated ad nauseum.) I think you also missed the part where what's on the radio is NOT chosen by the people- it is largely made by a tiny number of bureaucrats sticking to their own brand. Most websites with a "like" system and "popular" page are way more democratic than your local radio station, in that they give at least a good bit of exposure to new, wide-ranging material.

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  60. And then what happened? Music of the mid-60s, starting with the Beatles, gave a spark to the dormant gas bubble inside of many and ignited the flames of dissent.

    Unfortunately, we'll never see that again now that we've made our way back down to this level. Any musician who tries to go full-on countercultural will get buried in today's market the same way the Dixie Chicks did (not that I paid them much attention anyway before their Bush comments).

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  61. If you're listening to top 40 radio, you need your art spoon fed. This isn't a new concept. Time to listen to some Bad Religion.

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  62. I frequently listen to electronic music, where does that land on the IQ continuum? I haven't read the paper quoted, but operationalizing music as smart or dumb seems dumb. Just like measuring someones IQ with traditional measures yields a simplified and worthless number, trying to illuminate socital decline by measuring the amount of tricky words in a song seems vague. Why is everyone going to such lengths to vilify and personify the "conglomerates" and "the government". There is no room full of bald suited twats sitting somewhere rubbing their hands at our expense. It's a large scale system, which means it is impossible to "target" and even slower to change. Since you obviously have the intellectual strength to buy a thesaurus, why do you have to keep creating blind alleys for people. The popular music industry is shite, the educational system is suboptimal and most of the people around you don't read books…. These are all issues we can work against, if we stop all the borderline illuminati bullshit

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  63. I wonder how many people below me are arguing in a failed attempt to seem smart themselves. And at the same time proving some of the issues our society has in this article…irony… Nah, just the American Facebook disease where everyone must be right about their "point of view". No matter at what or who's expense.

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  64. But it is significant that socially responsible art is not endorsed by companies pumping out the radio selections.

    All it would take is for a couple managers to say, hey, you know what, I like this guy who sings about things that matter, let's give him a shot. But more often, it's the other way around- they cuff artists over the head if they get "too" cerebral either because they wrongfully assume the audience wants dumb (or some convoluted conspiracy? idk). Occasionally you get gems like Colbie Calliat and Anna Nalick that manage to slip in meaningful stuff past the firewall.

    People making art for art's sake have no inherent social responsibility- influential trendsetters who choose *what to give exposure to,* who elevate the "discussion" or not, do.

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  65. No subsitute for an actual trained therapist.

    More like taking a chocolate/sugar pill placebo- it makes you feel good momentarily- but most likely does not address underlying symptoms.

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  66. I think it would have been interesting to see what the Lyric Intelligence scale would have determined about progressive metal/rock music, which in my opinion is the only genre with any kind of dignity left and the only one continuing to break new ground like Between the Buried and Me, Dream Theater or Porcupine Tree. Surely anyone who has attempted to "turn on" a top 100 listener to any of those bands knows the vacant stare and barely masked fear people display when confronted with the virtuosity and unusually epic arrangements of such bands.

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  67. Listen to TOOL and you will see what a true lyricist can do with a grown-up vocabulary. An artist is only limited by their education and intention, not by what words are "catchy" or "sounds good".

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  68. Besides the Fact that the Bands you named are indeed awesome and innovative, thats total Bullshit. Prog Metal and Rock are NOT the only genres with some "dignity" left. Quit this Elitism Bullshit.

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  69. But check this out – when you finished reading the article, as you scrolled to the end of the page here were the SPONSERING ads:

    “Men, you don’t need Viagra if you do this daily”
    “New “Limitless Pill Takes Internet By Storm!”
    “These Girls Wish These Embarrassing Photos Never Saw The Light Of Day”
    “35 Awkward Ball Photos That, Um – Just Take A Look!”
    “32 Stupidest Selfies Ever Taken!”
    “Remove Your Eyebags In Two Minutes”

    So here we have an article disclaiming stupidity in today’s pop musical lyrics with the idiot internet links. Go Figure

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  70. 2 things in this article are outright fallacy. They don't train people to get jobs. lol They train people to think their way.

    "Country spent billions on accountability"

    If these people were accountable, things would be changing, because we'd know where the problem lies and who is responsible. You don't spend money on accountability. What the fuck does that even mean?

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  71. If you're going to publish your conspiracy nonsense, at least get your shit straight. The only intriguing thing about this article is the part about lyrics and reading levels. There is also a major overuse of certain big words to make the author seem intelligent. Comes off as pretentious because you're not using words correctly.

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  72. People are obviously expressing themselves in the same capabilities as third graders then. And other people relate. That is still pathetic.

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  73. This article makes me want to listen to some Atmosphere and Incubus. Mmmmmm meaningful lyrics.

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  74. This article fails to make its case. If you are looking for raised literacy levels through pop music, you are an idiot.

    225 songs is a ridiculously small sample. The misapplication of scientific methodology is a far better indicator of stupidity. A single study based on a selection of 225 chart songs does not provide data of any value, it merely supports the lazy theory that society is becoming dumbed down. Look up cognitive bias: if you allow yourself to search only for evidence that supports your prejudice, you will find it, surprisingly enough.

    There have been a number of memes spread on the dumbing down of lyrics, lamenting the loss of a mythical time of verbal virtuosity. This is just a pseudo-scientific reiteration of that claptrap.

    I thought anti-media would be proud of its critical judgement and disdain the propagation of such tripe.

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  75. This article is intellectually bankrupt. It grades the intelligence of the lyrics of genres as a generalized lump, and then goes on to say that the standard for judging the music is flawed (the education system). The lyrics that are presented do not reflect the IQ of those who listen to it, the lyrics do not make you dumb. Secondly if people want smart music they will listen to smart music. People abandon all free will and pursuit of knowledge because that is what six corporations dictate. Let us abandon all reason and personal responsibility and blame the corporation. Wrong, we support the firm with our money, if you don't like "stupid" music don't buy it. If you don't like the music on the radio, turn the station to some classical.

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  76. Well said Norman. You really have inspired me to abandon Facebook and return to real world social encounters rather than dealing with anti social mealy mouthed pontificators. Thank you.

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  77. That's quite a big generalisation you're making there. A lot of rap music is actually lyrically more advanced than some other genres. Also a lot of rap isn't. But I guess you have this in every genre.

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